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  • Ethical Practices of Shaping an Interdisciplinary Global Fieldwork Course

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Who is benefiting from child life students completing international fieldwork and why? These are questions considered during the development and assessment of a global fieldwork course for child life, occupational therapy, and nursing students

    Who is benefiting from child life students completing international fieldwork and why? These are questions considered during the development and assessment of a global fieldwork course for child life, occupational therapy, and nursing students. Examples of the ethical considerations established as part of an interdisciplinary team are highlighted to emphasize the sustainability and integrity of this course for students and the populations served. 

    Objectives:
    Describe the learning objectives of child life students and professionals engaging in global fieldwork.
    Explain the benefits for child life students and professionals of global and interdisciplinary fieldwork experiences with other health professionals.
    Analyze the ethical considerations based on research and course development that are recognized as best practices of global health fieldwork education.
    Identify strategies for implementing ethically competent procedures to establish and maintain interdisciplinary global fieldwork

    DeAnna L Bay

    Internship Coordinator- Psych/Child Life

    Utica College

">Includes Credits

Child Life Specialists have a unique role in supporting children and families through a variety of challenges. In the Emergency Department, broken bones and stitches are a daily occurrence, but what happens when those injuries are suspected to be the result of abuse?

Child Life Specialists have a unique role in supporting children and families through a variety of challenges. In the Emergency Department, broken bones and stitches are a daily occurrence, but what happens when those injuries are suspected to be the result of abuse? This presentation will provide child life specialists with the skills to educate, prepare, and advocate for children of abuse from admission through hospital discharge. 

Objectives:
Explore terminology, support services, and prevalence of child abuse.
Identify and address common behaviors seen in children who have a history of abuse.
Communicate and provide appropriate interventions for admitted patients who have been removed from the home and will be entering the foster care system due to abuse.
Identify how to support children and families during an end-of-life coroner's case.
Discuss the legal responsibilities as a mandated reporter and how to remain within your scope of practice as a child life specialist.

Kayleigh M. Chang

Certified Child Life Specialist II-Emergency Department

Kayleigh attended Loma Linda University where she received her M.S. in Child Life after attending California State University, Fullerton for her B.A. in Communication Studies where she discovered her fascination for working with diverse populations.

Kayleigh is currently working as a child life specialist in the Emergency Department at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford and is a member of the Lucile Packard SCAN (Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect) Team, where she purses her passion advocating for children of abuse. Kayleigh balances her clinical work by teaching an online grief and loss course to child life students at UC Santa Barbara Extension.

Kayleigh serves on the Child Life Certification Commission for ACLP working on content for future child life certification exams. She was also a participant in the ACLP Child Life Job Analysis in 2018.

  • A Pedagogy of Inclusion: Integrating Topics of Diversity and Social Justice into Child Life Curriculum

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​The Association of Child Life Professionals includes diversity as a core tenet of the values and mission of the child life profession. This presentation will consider the integration of diversity and social justice theories into child life curriculum.

    The Association of Child Life Professionals includes diversity as a core tenet of the values and mission of the child life profession. This presentation will consider the integration of diversity and social justice theories into child life curriculum. Presenters will explore approaches for teaching, examine the implications for students, and discuss how this integration can enhance evidence based practice and organizational growth. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss approaches for integrating diversity and social justice topics into child life curriculum.
    Describe the impact integrating social justice curriculum can have on the student experience and their clinical growth.
    Discuss the implications this curriculum might have on reinforcing the field's core tenet of diversity.

    Kathryn A Cantrell

    Lecturer

    Kathryn Cantrell, PhD, CCLS is a child psychologist and child life specialist living in Boston. Kathryn received her masters in child development from Tufts University and worked as a child life specialist with youth with HIV at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis before pursuing more education. Kathryn received her doctorate in counseling psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston and has worked clinically as a child psychologist in a number of settings across the city. Kathryn currently works as a Lecturer at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts Boston, supporting emerging clinicians interested in helping youth. Kathryn teaches courses on child life, child development, and counseling at both universities. She is also Executive Editor of the ACLP's Bulletin and Focus publications. Her applied developmental research addresses healthcare disparities amongst youth and emerging adults by integrating evidence based intervention with technology as a tool for furthering social justice. Her research has been published in a number of peer reviewed journals, chronicled in chapters, and shared at international conferences.

    Elizabeth Gaitskill

    Child Life Specialist, Diagnostic Imaging

    Libby Gaitskill is from Sugar Hill, New Hampshire and earned her Bachelor of Arts in Public and Community Service Studies and Bachelor of Science in Health Policy and Management from Providence College. After working as a case worker for a year, she then completed a Master of Arts in Child Study and Human Development with a concentration in Clinical Developmental Health and Psychology with a degree focus in Child Life at Tufts University. Libby joined the child life team at St. Jude Children’s Hospital in September 2018. She currently works with patients of all ages in diagnostic imaging. Inspired by the social justice focus of her child life coursework, Libby uses this framework in her clinical role.

  • Call Me….Maybe: Collaboration between Child Life Specialists at Separate Institutions to Enhance Patient Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​In order to receive specialized care, many pediatric patients must travel away from their usual care team to other institutions. Collaboration between child life specialists at different institutions enhances the patient experience

    In order to receive specialized care, many pediatric patients must travel away from their usual care team to other institutions. Collaboration between child life specialists at different institutions enhances the patient experience. This presentation will describe how two specialists identified a need for a transition tool and regular communication. Case examples, the transition tool and implications for practice will be shared. 

    Objectives:
    Identify potential gaps in communication regarding the transfer of patient care.
    Discuss the implementation of a transfer form.
    List strategies for enhancing patient coping, continuity of care and patient and family satisfaction.

    Brittany L. Metcalf

    CCLS

    Boston Children's Hospital

    Jamie E. McCaffrey

    Hem/Onc Child Life Specialist

    The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital at the Maine Medical Ce

  • Laughter: The Best Medicine!

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​The focus of this presentation is to examine how humor can be used to help relieve stress in patients as well as the medical team.

    The focus of this presentation is to examine how humor can be used to help relieve stress in patients as well as the medical team. Through examples and discussion, participants will take away key components to incorporate humor to their daily child life practice to help build resiliency for both patients and staff.

     Objectives:
    Explore the impact of humor between patients and health care staff.
    Engage in group discussions to brainstorm the fit for humor in their programming.
    Discuss the literature and evidence base for the positive and negative roles of humor.

    Brittany E. O'Shea

    CCLS

    Brittany O'Shea, HMBA, CCLS, is currently completing her seventh year as a child life specialist. She received her undergraduate degree from Edgewood College in Madison, WI, where she majored in child life. In October 2017, Brittany earned her Healthcare Management Masters of Business Administration from Chrisfian Brothers University. Currently, she is a child life specialist for the neuro-oncology and solid tumor patients from birth to 10 years old on the inpatient unit at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Brittany utilizes humor on the inpatient unit with her medical team to help lighten the mood and help the inpatients cope with their treatment. Brittany is an active member of the neuro-oncology/solid tumor shared decision-making council and is currently working with leadership to implement a facility dog program.

    Shawn Brasher

    CCLS

    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

  • Pediatric Post Suicide Attempts: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Holistic Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This presentation will highlight clinical examples of patients admitted post-suicide attempt and the various avenues child life specialists and music therapists may explore when assessing and providing interventions

    This presentation will highlight clinical examples of patients admitted post-suicide attempt and the various avenues child life specialists and music therapists may explore when assessing and providing interventions. Using a holistic approach, the presenters hope to bridge a gap in services as this population has the potential to be quite vulnerable. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss pediatric suicide and subsequent hospitalization.
    Discuss how to effectively collaborate with team members to provide best practice.
    Discuss various therapeutic interventions and rationale that can be replicated in various settings.

    Shawna Nicole Vernisie

    CCLS

    Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York

  • 2019 Child Life Annual Conference: All Access Pass

    Contains 42 Product(s)

    Get a front row seat for our 2019 Child Life conference sessions. This package offers the opportunity to view over 40 sessions from our 2019 conference and earn more than 45+ PDUs.

    Get a front row seat for our 2019 Child Life conference sessions. This package offers the opportunity to view over 40 sessions from our 2019 conference and earn more than 45+ PDUs. 

  • Considering the Caregiver: Techniques for Assessment, Empowerment, and Attachment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Evidence has shown the impact that caregiver coping skills and anxiety have on a child's ability to cope. In this presentation presenters will share resources, tools, and discuss their experiences empowering caregivers in the hospital and beyond

    Evidence has shown the impact that caregiver coping skills and anxiety have on a child's ability to cope. In this presentation presenters will share resources, tools, and discuss their experiences empowering caregivers in the hospital and beyond. This workshop will walk through caregiver assessment, collaboration with other disciplines, evidenced-based practice, and a unique resource created by presenters to promote attachment and family bonding. 

    Objectives: Apply current research surrounding caregiver stress and challenges within the hospital setting.
    Gain insight into the unique practice of caregiver assessment
    Identify and implement ways in which the psychosocial care team and provide unique and meaning interventions for caregivers Identify resources within their hospital and be empowered to find creative tools to overcome challenges when working with caregivers

    Camille E. Fraser

    CCLS

    Camille Fraser, MS, CCLS is a Certified Child Life Specialist working with the cardiology population at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee. Within this role, she works in the outpatient cardiology clinic, the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit, and the cardiac step-down unit. She has been a child life specialist for four years and has also worked in acute care, and PRN roles. Her educational background includes a Bachelor of Arts degree in family relations from Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tennessee, and a Master of Science degree in child life from Bank Street College of Education in New York, New York. Her master’s thesis discusses the ways in which child life specialists and music therapists can support infants in forming secure attachments to caregivers in the hospital setting. In addition to practicing child life, she is also an adjunct professor teaching child life courses at Lipscomb University.

    Dana Kim

    CCLS

    Dana Kim, MA, MT-BC, is a board certified music therapist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee. She graduated summa cum laude from Xavier University with a Bachelor of Music in vocal performance and business minor before pursuing an equivalency degree and Master of Arts in music therapy through Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College. Dana has a wide range of clinical experience working with children and adults with disabilities and/or medical and psychiatric conditions. She uses clinical and evidence-based music interventions to help both patients and families cope with hospitalization, manage anxiety, alleviate pain, express feelings, improve communication, and promote physical rehabilitation.

    Dana’s research interests include attachment, bonding, and procedural support. In 2017, Dana completed a prospective, randomized controlled trial exploring the effects of a music therapist-designed listening program on intraoperative blood pressure, heart rate, and need for pain/anxiety medication, as well as postoperative pain and patient satisfaction during vitrectomy surgery. In addition to her clinical work, Dana currently serves on the nominating committee for the Tennessee Association of Music Therapists and is nominated for a position on the Southeastern Region of the American Music Therapy Association Assembly of Delegates. Dana has also taught undergraduate music therapy courses at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee.

    Allison Caroline Leidy

    CCLS

    Allie Leidy, MA, CCLS is a Certified Child Life Specialist working with the hematology/oncology population at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee. She has been a child life specialist for two years. Her educational background includes a Bachelor of Science degree in human development and family studies from The Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pennsylvania and a Master of Arts degree in child life from The University of Akron.

    Kelsey Lownds

    CCLS

    Kelsey Lownds, MM, MT-BC, NICU-MT is a board-certified music therapist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee. She provides services to all inpatient units. Kelsey has been a music therapist for over four years and has also worked with children with special needs, older adults, early childhood, and in adolescent/adult mental health. Her educational background includes a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology, doubling majoring in music from Centre College and she also has a Master of Music degree in music therapy from the University of Kentucky. Kelsey is the co-author of the Pediatric Medical Music Therapy chapter in the new AMTA Introductory textbook, published author in Imagine Early Childhood Magazine, and a national and international conference presenter. In addition to practicing music therapy, she was an adjunct professor teaching music therapy courses at Belmont University in the fall of 2018.

  • Defining Legacy: A study of Pediatric Patients, Parents, and Providers

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Legacy is more than a hand mold, yet current research has done little to define what a legacy can be, contain, and accomplish. Therefore, this presentation will detail the results of a qualitative study about the legacy perceptions of pediatric healthcare providers, hospitalized children, and their caregivers

    Legacy is more than a hand mold, yet current research has done little to define what a legacy can be, contain, and accomplish. Therefore, this presentation will detail the results of a qualitative study about the legacy perceptions of pediatric healthcare providers, hospitalized children, and their caregivers. By exploring how these groups understand legacy, child life professionals can inform, improve, and individualize legacy interventions.

    Objectives:
    Participants will review the current research base concerning legacy theories and legacy building interventions.
    Participants will consider the ways in which legacy concepts and theories function in a multidisciplinary pediatric hospital environment.
    Participants will identify similarities and differences in conceptions of legacy across pediatric healthcare providers, pediatric patients, and their caregivers.
    Participants will explore the implications of this research for legacy building interventions in child life practice.

    Sophie Apple

    CCLS

    Sophie attended Vanderbilt for both her undergraduate and masters degree and recently received her M.Ed. In Applied Child Studies. She completed her internship at Tulane Lakeside Hospital in August 2018. Sophie has a passion for research in the field of child life and spent much of her time in school and beyond working on research in the area of legacy building interventions at the end life

    Jessika Boles

    PhD, CCLS

    Jessika Boles, PhD, CCLS is a child life specialist in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. She has nearly ten years of clinical experience, in addition to several years of academic and research training in applied child development, education, and psychology. She has published work in various medical and psychosocial journals, and has presented at national and international conferences in child development, psychology, education and child life. In her spare time, she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses related to working with children and families in hospitals and research methods, and is currently serving as the chair of the Academic Review Committee of the Association of Child Life Professionals.

    Kristen Brady

    CCLS

    Kristen Brady is a Certified Child Life Specialist working in the Outpatient Clinics at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in Memphis, TN. She received her Bachelor's of Science in Child Development from Vanderbilt University in 2016 and her Master's of Education in Child Studies from Vanderbilt University in 2018. Her research interests include legacy-building in hospital settings and young children's ability to learn social emotional skills through technology.

  • Scope of Practice in the Profession of Child Life

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will provide attendees with an overview of scope of practice, including definitions and history of the phrase, use of the phrase in health care and current standards for scope of practice as established by ACLP. The interface between scope of practice and ethical practice will be examined and examples will be provided of challenging situations faced by child life professionals.

    This webinar will provide attendees with an overview of scope of practice, including definitions and history of the phrase, use of the phrase in health care and current standards for scope of practice as established by ACLP. The interface between scope of practice and ethical practice will be examined and examples will be provided of challenging situations faced by child life professionals.

    After this webinar, participants will have:
    1. an understanding of the history of the phrase "scope of practice" 2. knowledge of the references to scope of practice in child life professional documents
    3.the ability to determine scope of child life practice in a variety of actual clinical situations
    4.an increased level of awareness of the relationship between ethical decision-making and scope of practice

    Domain: Professional Responsibility 

    Kathleen McCue

    MA, LSW, CCLS