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  • From the Classroom to the Community: An Academic/Community Hospital Partnership for Program Development

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    An academic child life program seized the opportunity to collaborate with a community hospital to assess the need for child life programming. An experienced child life specialist was hired as a consultant to develop a programming recommendation. Within 18 months the partnership resulted in a funded child life program and hiring of the first Certified Child Life Specialist. This session will highlight the components of this successful pilot project.

    An academic child life program seized the opportunity to collaborate with a community hospital to assess the need for child life programming. An experienced child life specialist was hired as a consultant to develop a programming recommendation. Within 18 months the partnership resulted in a funded child life program and hiring of the first Certified Child Life Specialist. This session will highlight the components of this successful pilot project.

  • Perceptions of Children with Chronic Illnesses Regarding 'Play in Hospital': Research Findings

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learn how children with chronic illnesses shared their perceptions of 'play in hospital', how they defined play, who and what were important for play, and how their chronic illness has an effect on their play behaviors and their lives. This presentation will also explore the implications of the research findings on child life practice and future research with children.

    Learn how children with chronic illnesses shared their perceptions of 'play in hospital', how they defined play, who and what were important for play, and how their chronic illness has an effect on their play behaviors and their lives. This presentation will also explore the implications of the research findings on child life practice and future research with children.

  • Preparing For The Future: A Practicum Program For Students and Supervisors

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Practicum experiences are valuable for all members involved – the students learning and the staff supervising. One hospital will share their journey in building a practicum program that prepares students in the foundations of child life and for their full-time internship, while also training staff in supervising and mentoring students to reach their potential.

    Practicum experiences are valuable for all members involved – the students learning and the staff supervising. One hospital will share their journey in building a practicum program that prepares students in the foundations of child life and for their full-time internship, while also training staff in supervising and mentoring students to reach their potential.

  • Working Smarter, Not Harder: Perspectives on Implementing a New Staffing Model Within a Child Life Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    It is evident that that child life services advance quality and outcomes in health care as well as the patient and family experience. This presentation will explore one hospital's journey to adapt to change by implementing a unique staffing model to best meet the needs of patients and families. The development of a task force, methods utilized to assist with ideas, and processes adapted to support changes will be explored.

    It is evident that that child life services advance quality and outcomes in health care as well as the patient and family experience. This presentation will explore one hospital's journey to adapt to change by implementing a unique staffing model to best meet the needs of patients and families. The development of a task force, methods utilized to assist with ideas, and processes adapted to support changes will be explored.

  • A Passage to Nowhere: Guiding a Child Transitioning to Foster Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Children transitioning from the hospital to foster care can be an extremely vulnerable population who experience a variety of difficult emotions. A therapeutic intervention has been created to assist in applying the foundational child life skills to facilitate understanding and positive coping during this traumatic transition.

    Children transitioning from the hospital to foster care can be an extremely vulnerable population who experience a variety of difficult emotions. A therapeutic intervention has been created to assist in applying the foundational child life skills to facilitate understanding and positive coping during this traumatic transition.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Recognize national statistics related to instances of child abuse, maltreatment, and foster care placement.
    ■ Identify current needs in preparation strategies for children transitioning from healthcare settings to foster care.
    ■ Identify fundamental child life principles and skills to children in this transition using a therapeutic workbook as a tool. ■ Recognize the unique role as helping adults provide developmentally supportive care to children experiencing complex emotions and change.

  • Online Patient Communities For Youth With Chronic Illness: A Systematic Review

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online patient communities for youth with chronic illnesses are a fast growing option for accessing social support and health information easily. Research suggests that participation in an online patient communities can have both psychosocial and physical health benefits.  A review of the most recent trends in the literature chronicling pediatric online patient communities provides skills in evaluating and curating based on patient needs.

    Online patient communities for youth with chronic illnesses are a fast growing option for accessing social support and health information easily. Research suggests that participation in an online patient communities can have both psychosocial and physical health benefits.  A review of the most recent trends in the literature chronicling pediatric online patient communities provides skills in evaluating and curating based on patient needs.

  • Connecting The Pieces: A Program For Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Families in an Outpatient Surgery Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) visit healthcare providers more frequently than typically developing children. The process of having surgery can be chaotic, confusing, loud, and full of transitions, which are all potential stress triggers for children with ASD. A program designed to fit the unique needs of these patients can help increase patients’ understanding of hospitalization, decrease stress, encourage positive coping techniques, and create a more family-centered care environment.

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) visit healthcare providers more frequently than typically developing children. The process of having surgery can be chaotic, confusing, loud, and full of transitions, which are all potential stress triggers for children with ASD. A program designed to fit the unique needs of these patients can help increase patients’ understanding of hospitalization, decrease stress, encourage positive coping techniques, and create a more family-centered care environment.

  • Introducing Quality Improvement Into Child Life Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    We have all faced hurdles in our practice when advocating for what we know is best for the patients and families we serve. What is the best way to bring about change so that it is realistic, achievable, and long-lasting? Learn how to use current evidence and basic quality improvement (QI) techniques to make impactful and sustainable changes in your institution

    We have all faced hurdles in our practice when advocating for what we know is best for the patients and families we serve. What is the best way to bring about change so that it is realistic, achievable, and long-lasting? Learn how to use current evidence and basic quality improvement (QI) techniques to make impactful and sustainable changes in your institution

  • Implementing Multiple Mini Interviews (Mmi)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    For anyone conducting interviews, Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI) provide opportunities to observe specific traits and require candidates to “think on their feet” during the process. Strategically designed scenarios are created with desired job related attributes in mind and organized to reduce time spent interviewing. Through the MMI, interviewers make unbiased assessments while experiencing a true snapshot of the candidates’ job related skills and behaviors.

    For anyone conducting interviews, Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI) provide opportunities to observe specific traits and require candidates to “think on their feet” during the process. Strategically designed scenarios are created with desired job related attributes in mind and organized to reduce time spent interviewing. Through the MMI, interviewers make unbiased assessments while experiencing a true snapshot of the candidates’ job related skills and behaviors.

  • Basics and Beyond: Creative Ways to Use Medical Play In and Out of the Hospital

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Research shows that children facing medical procedures experience less anxiety and increased cooperation when given the opportunity to participate in medical play. Learn how to share the importance of this task with medical staff, and how the basics of medical play can be expanded upon to bring support to children both in and out of the hospital setting.

    Research shows that children facing medical procedures experience less anxiety and increased cooperation when given the opportunity to participate in medical play. Learn how to share the importance of this task with medical staff, and how the basics of medical play can be expanded upon to bring support to children both in and out of the hospital setting.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Describe the purpose of medical play in a traditional child life setting.
    ■ Discuss the basics of medical play and how it is commonly used in hospitals and other medical settings, as well as be able to explain the difference between directed medical play and non-directed medical play.
    ■ Demonstrate ways to adapt medical play to fit the needs of each child, and how to expand upon the basics to bring unique medical play experiences to their patients.
    ■ Take medical play out of the hospital and into school visits, community outreach programs, fundraisers, and more.