2018 Child Life Annual Conference: All Access Pass

  • Registration Closed

Get a front row seat for our 2018 Child Life conference sessions. This package offers the opportunity to earn 60+ PDU Credit with our 2018 conference recordings! Over 50 sessions - Over 60 hours! 

  • Do the Right Thing: Teaching Ethics in the Academic and Clinical Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    In this presentation, an academic instructor and a clinical student coordinator will discuss how to implement approaches to cultivating healthcare ethics in students, colleagues, and oneself.

    In this presentation, an academic instructor and a clinical student coordinator will discuss how to implement approaches to cultivating healthcare ethics in students, colleagues, and oneself. The use of scenarios, instructional tools, and creative tools, such as games, will be introduced. This presentation connects academics and clinical experiences in the responsibility of cultivating ethics in students and provides others with tools to promote ideal ethical child life behaviors and practices.

  • Relationships to Retention: Methods for Onboarding New Staff

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    Onboarding staff of all experience levels is a part of the professional world. Showing newcomers that an organization and team are ready for them to utilize their expertise and strengths is a valuable opportunity to establish supportive professional relationships, possibly leading to increased retention. Relevant evidence and tangible, applicable methods will be shared for consideration and use in a variety of programs.

    Onboarding staff of all experience levels is a part of the professional world. Showing newcomers that an organization and team are ready for them to utilize their expertise and strengths is a valuable opportunity to establish supportive professional relationships, possibly leading to increased retention. Relevant evidence and tangible, applicable methods will be shared for consideration and use in a variety of programs.
  • Stressing the Importance of Child Life: A Neurobiological Perspective of Child Life and Implications for Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    It is understood that child life intervention yields positive outcomes in patients’ coping and development; however, the mechanism by which these occur is seldom a focus of child life professionals. Neuroscience and biology fill an often-overlooked gap in child life theory, providing compelling insight into the efficacy of child life interventions. This presentation aims to explore connections between child life practice and neuroscientific concepts including developmental plasticity, stress, and healing.

    It is understood that child life intervention yields positive outcomes in patients’ coping and development; however, the mechanism by which these occur is seldom a focus of child life professionals. Neuroscience and biology fill an often-overlooked gap in child life theory, providing compelling insight into the efficacy of child life interventions. This presentation aims to explore connections between child life practice and neuroscientific concepts including developmental plasticity, stress, and healing.

  • Building Child Life Programming in Previously Unserved Populations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    In hospital settings where child life specialists work on a specific unit, there can be unserved populations that get overlooked. A child life specialist can assess the needs, find their place within a new team, and adapt interventions in order to provide crucial services and positively effect children and families whose needs were previously unmet.

    In hospital settings where child life specialists work on a specific unit, there can be unserved populations that get overlooked. A child life specialist can assess the needs, find their place within a new team, and adapt interventions in order to provide crucial services and positively effect children and families whose needs were previously unmet.

  • Assessing Children with Special Health Care Needs Perceptions of Health Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN)are a vulnerable population with complex medical needs requiring many different services. The purpose of this research was to assess children with special health care needs perceptions of their health care experiences. Child-centered data collection methods enhanced the participants’ expression of health care perceptions. This research offers child life specialists evidence based yet practical assessment strategies for this vulnerable population.

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN)are a vulnerable population with complex medical needs requiring many different services. The purpose of this research was to assess children with special health care needs perceptions of their health care experiences. Child-centered data collection methods enhanced the participants’ expression of health care perceptions. This research offers child life specialists evidence based yet practical assessment strategies for this vulnerable population.

  • Making the Most of Medical Play

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Medical play is considered to be a core component of child life programming and is frequently utilized to aid in providing preparation for medical experiences. Medical play also incorporates a variety of additional modalities such as medical art, role rehearsal/role reversal and needle play. This presentation will explore all aspects of medical play with an emphasis on the lesser implemented types of medical play.

    Medical play is considered to be a core component of child life programming and is frequently utilized to aid in providing preparation for medical experiences. Medical play also incorporates a variety of additional modalities such as medical art, role rehearsal/role reversal and needle play. This presentation will explore all aspects of medical play with an emphasis on the lesser implemented types of medical play.

  • Collaboration for Better Care: Integrating Art and Music Therapy in an Inpatient Child Life Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Art and Music Therapists often work alongside child life in children’s hospitals. How can child life specialists collaborate with these professionals to provide the best care for patients and families? Presenters will share their experiences working together as part of an inpatient child life program, provide examples of successful efforts, share information from interprofessional education research, and include suggestions for fostering strong connections.

    Art and Music Therapists often work alongside child life in children’s hospitals. How can child life specialists collaborate with these professionals to provide the best care for patients and families? Presenters will share their experiences working together as part of an inpatient child life program, provide examples of successful efforts, share information from interprofessional education research, and include suggestions for fostering strong connections.

  • Current Research Findings on Child and Parent Communication Preferences for Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis Disclosure

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Child life specialists foster trust by communicating with children in a developmentally appropriate way throughout the treatment trajectory. Developmental theory underscores the necessity of trust for communication, yet limited research supports the facilitation of intentional conversations related to diagnosis and prognosis. This presentation will report research findings on child and parent communication preferences, which will empower child life specialists to advocate for honest developmentally appropriate information throughout a patient’s treatment.

    Child life specialists foster trust by communicating with children in a developmentally appropriate way throughout the treatment trajectory. Developmental theory underscores the necessity of trust for communication, yet limited research supports the facilitation of intentional conversations related to diagnosis and prognosis. This presentation will report research findings on child and parent communication preferences, which will empower child life specialists to advocate for honest developmentally appropriate information throughout a patient’s treatment.

  • A Labor of Love: Achievements in Program Development

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Based on three years of program expansion in the NICU and family birth center, this workshop will equip participants with tools to enhance patient experience and implement innovative clinical interventions. The presentation will address acquisition of funds for program development, staff education, and implementation of strategies to improve patient experience and staff engagement. Participants will engage in a hands-on activity to explore an intervention for application within their program.

    Based on three years of program expansion in the NICU and family birth center, this workshop will equip participants with tools to enhance patient experience and implement innovative clinical interventions. The presentation will address acquisition of funds for program development, staff education, and implementation of strategies to improve patient experience and staff engagement. Participants will engage in a hands-on activity to explore an intervention for application within their program.

  • Surrounded by Guilt: Unpacking and Unloading the Guilt Carried by Professional Caregivers

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Child life professionals experience situations in both their professional and personal worlds that can lead to feelings of guilt. As part of self-care, it is important to channel appropriate guilt into positive attitudinal and behavioral changes while letting go of unnecessary guilt that can become exhausting to carry. This presentation reviews types and purposes of guilt, leadership implications for guilt-prone individuals and strategies for coping with guilt.

    Child life professionals experience situations in both their professional and personal worlds that can lead to feelings of guilt. As part of self-care, it is important to channel appropriate guilt into positive attitudinal and behavioral changes while letting go of unnecessary guilt that can become exhausting to carry. This presentation reviews types and purposes of guilt, leadership implications for guilt-prone individuals and strategies for coping with guilt.