2019 ACLP Assessment Bundle

  • Registration Closed

Please note, this package will be open for registration at the discounted member rate of $99 from Black Friday through Cyber Monday. 


Looking to strengthen your assessment skills? This 5 webinar package offers participants the chance to fortify their assessment skills and earn 7.5 PDUs in the Assessment Domain. 

We're thankful for our members. This package will be open for registration from Black Friday through Cyber Monday for a member's only price of just $99. 

This package contains access to the following webinars:

-Utilizing a Strength-Based Approach in Child Life Practice
-“What’s Going on in that Teenager’s Brain?” Understanding the Adolescent Brain and its Effects on Hospitalization 
-Meeting Families Where They Are: Using Assessment to Get There
-NICU ABCs: Child Life Assessment and Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
-You’re Stressing Me Out! Applying The Family Systems Theory, Family Stress Theory, and ABC-X Model to Daily Child Life Practice
  • You’re Stressing Me Out! Applying The Family Systems Theory, Family Stress Theory, and ABC-X Model to Daily Child Life Practice.

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The hospital experience is often times stress provoking for children and their families. In this presentation, the family systems and stress theories as well as the ABC-X stress management model will be explored. Through discussion and case studies participants will work through examples of how to incorporate these theories and model into their daily practice.

    The hospital experience is often times stress provoking for children and their families. In this presentation, the family systems and stress theories as well as the ABC-X stress management model will be explored. Through discussion and case studies participants will work through examples of how to incorporate these theories and model into their daily practice.

  • Utilizing a Strength-Based Approach in Child Life Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Strength-based practice is a theoretical approach originally developed and employed in the field of social work. This philosophy attempts to highlight and build upon a person’s strengths rather than focusing on his or her deficits. This webinar presentation will define strength-based practice and describe its basic tenets as well as articulate specific ways to embrace this approach in the field of child life.

    Strength-based practice is a theoretical approach originally developed and employed in the field of social work. This philosophy attempts to highlight and build upon a person’s strengths rather than focusing on his or her deficits. This webinar presentation will define strength-based practice and describe its basic tenets as well as articulate specific ways to embrace this approach in the field of child life.

  • NICU ABCs: Child Life Assessment and Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Certified Child Life Specialists possess skills and abilities to meet the unique needs of infants and their families in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Core skills such as: assessment, preparation, education, psychosocial support, procedure support, and developmentally supportive interventions have translated successfully to this environment. In this presentation the developmental, psychosocial, and educational needs of this population will be discussed in depth, including assessment and intervention strategies unique to NICU patients, stressors families experience, and strategies to support the development of positive coping skills to foster optimal infant/parent and family bonding. Case studies, visual aids, and an opportunity for question and answer will be made available in this webinar.

    Certified Child Life Specialists possess skills and abilities to meet the unique needs of infants and their families in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Core skills such as: assessment, preparation, education, psychosocial support, procedure support, and developmentally supportive interventions have translated successfully to this environment. In this presentation the developmental, psychosocial, and educational needs of this population will be discussed in depth, including assessment and intervention strategies unique to NICU patients, stressors families experience, and strategies to support the development of positive coping skills to foster optimal infant/parent and family bonding. Case studies, visual aids, and an opportunity for question and answer will be made available in this webinar.  

    After this webinar, participants will have:

    an understanding of and ability to describe three stages of premature/sick infant development

    the ability to assess development and implement developmentally supportive interventions for each stage

    a familiarity with the stressors experienced by families in the NICU

    strategies to support positive coping skill for parents and siblings

    Christ Tryon

    CCLS

    Chris Tryon is a level IV child life specialist who has focused much of her 20-year career in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).  She developed, established, and currently maintains the NICU child life program at Golisano Children’s Hospital in Rochester, NY. Her expertise lies in supporting and advocating for the developmental and psychosocial needs of children and their families in this setting. In addition to her clinical responsibilities, Chris provides staff education, participates in policy and procedure development, mentors child life practicum students and interns, serves as a developmental consultant to the health care team and supervises the NICU volunteer program. Chris is also a member of the NICU developmental care team, the NICU pain team, and chair of the NICU graduate reunion committee.  She is also a member of the Association of Child Life Professionals (ACLP) and the ACLP Advanced Professional Development Committee.

  • Meeting Families Where They Are: Using Assessment to Get There

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The way families react to the medical environment drives how clinicians provide support. By thoroughly assessing the family, the clinician can provide the best individualized care.

    The way families react to the medical environment drives how clinicians provide support. By thoroughly assessing the family, the clinician can provide the best individualized care. Conflict can occur when a family’s opinion of their own needs does not align with the assessment of the child life specialist and medical team. The clinicians must adapt to the needs of the patient and the family in order to provide the highest quality of care. This presentation will highlight the benefits of evaluating each family and how to incorporate that information into daily practice. 

    Amy Kennedy

    CCLS

    Amy  Kennedy earned her Bachelor of Science degree in child and family development from Missouri State University in 1995 and became a Certified Child Life Specialist in 1998.  Amy previously worked at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis for 3 years.  As lead child life specialist for the child life program at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Amy is responsible for providing child life services in the radiation oncology clinic. Throughout her 18 years with St. Jude, she has held positions on the bone marrow transplant unit and worked as the inpatient specialist serving patients with leukemia, lymphoma, or solid tumors. As a lead child life specialist Amy assists in research, facilitating clinical supervision, and providing leadership and mentorship to her peers within the child life program. In all of her roles her focus has been on providing individualized support to meet the needs of the patients and families where they were in their healthcare experience.  

    Ashley Anderst

    CCLS

    Ashley Anderst earned her BS degree at the University of North Dakota in 2007, where she majored in early childhood education. Ashley completed her child life internship at Shriners Hospital for Children in Spokane, WA. Ashley began her career in the child life field at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital in Spokane, WA in 2008 where she provided per diem services to all clinical areas. Ashley continued her career at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN in 2008 and is currently providing care to patients and families in neuro-oncology. During her time at St. Jude, Ashley has served on the hospital’s Professional Excellence Council which promotes clinical excellence within the institution. In every setting, Ashley has focused on the importance of meeting each family where they are to provide individualized support during their hospital experience.

  • “What’s Going on in that Teenager’s Brain?” Understanding the Adolescent Brain and its Effects on Hospitalization

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Working with adolescents can be challenging inside and outside of the hospital setting. Understanding the development of the adolescent brain, both anatomically and psychologically, can provide a child life specialist greater insight into assessing teens and creating effective interventions to implement in daily practice.

    Working with adolescents can be challenging inside and outside of the hospital setting.   Understanding the development of the adolescent brain, both anatomically and psychologically, can provide a child life specialist greater insight into assessing teens and creating effective interventions to implement in daily practice.  When teenagers are hospitalized frequently, it can leave many adolescents feeling isolated and possibly burdensome to their family.  It can be difficult for the teens to identify what “needs” they may have.  Through interventions focusing on identifying emotions related to their hospital/illness experience, positive coping strategies can be taught to empower adolescents in their daily lives.    

    After this webinar, participants will have:

    the ability to discuss adolescent brain development and how this affects adolescents’ decision making

    the knowledge needed to identify the effects of illness, stress, and hospitalization in adolescents

    the tools to implement interventions and facilitate conversations with family and staff in an effort to provide maximum support to adolescents in the hospital

    Julia Mendoza

    CCLS

    Julia Mendoza has been a child life specialist at Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, TX, since 2006. She has worked with the neonatal population, on a surgical inpatient unit, and has been the pediatric dialysis child life specialist for six years. Working in the pediatric dialysis unit, Julia has had a variety of experience with adolescents dealing with a chronic illness. She has also been the child life internship coordinator since 2009 and is a current member of the ACLP practicum task force. 

    Kimmie Bayliss

    CCLS

    Kimmie Bayliss has worked as a child life specialist at Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, TX, for 9 years.  Areas she has worked in include a level one emergency center, an intensive outpatient program focusing on teens with medical and mental health needs, and pediatric intensive care unit/intermediate monitoring unit.  Since 2005, Kimmie also gained experience with teens living with chronic illnesses and their siblings while working at Camp For All in Burton, TX.