2019 Child Life Annual Conference: All Access Pass

Get a front row seat for our 2019 Child Life conference sessions. This package offers the opportunity to view over 40 sessions from our 2019 conference and earn more than 45+ PDUs. 

  • Considering the Caregiver: Techniques for Assessment, Empowerment, and Attachment

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Evidence has shown the impact that caregiver coping skills and anxiety have on a child's ability to cope. In this presentation presenters will share resources, tools, and discuss their experiences empowering caregivers in the hospital and beyond

    Evidence has shown the impact that caregiver coping skills and anxiety have on a child's ability to cope. In this presentation presenters will share resources, tools, and discuss their experiences empowering caregivers in the hospital and beyond. This workshop will walk through caregiver assessment, collaboration with other disciplines, evidenced-based practice, and a unique resource created by presenters to promote attachment and family bonding. 

    Objectives: Apply current research surrounding caregiver stress and challenges within the hospital setting.
    Gain insight into the unique practice of caregiver assessment
    Identify and implement ways in which the psychosocial care team and provide unique and meaning interventions for caregivers Identify resources within their hospital and be empowered to find creative tools to overcome challenges when working with caregivers

  • Defining Legacy: A study of Pediatric Patients, Parents, and Providers

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Legacy is more than a hand mold, yet current research has done little to define what a legacy can be, contain, and accomplish. Therefore, this presentation will detail the results of a qualitative study about the legacy perceptions of pediatric healthcare providers, hospitalized children, and their caregivers

    Legacy is more than a hand mold, yet current research has done little to define what a legacy can be, contain, and accomplish. Therefore, this presentation will detail the results of a qualitative study about the legacy perceptions of pediatric healthcare providers, hospitalized children, and their caregivers. By exploring how these groups understand legacy, child life professionals can inform, improve, and individualize legacy interventions.

    Objectives:
    Participants will review the current research base concerning legacy theories and legacy building interventions.
    Participants will consider the ways in which legacy concepts and theories function in a multidisciplinary pediatric hospital environment.
    Participants will identify similarities and differences in conceptions of legacy across pediatric healthcare providers, pediatric patients, and their caregivers.
    Participants will explore the implications of this research for legacy building interventions in child life practice.

  • Implementing a Hospital-Wide Roll Out: A Proactive Approach to Supporting Patients with Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Challenges

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Children with developmental disabilities experience anxiety in medical settings. Appropriate training and a comprehensive program for support is needed to decrease anxiety-based responses and increase opportunities for preventative care for those patients

    Children with developmental disabilities experience anxiety in medical settings. Appropriate training and a comprehensive program for support is needed to decrease anxiety-based responses and increase opportunities for preventative care for those patients . This presentation will outline how one children's hospital implemented a hospital-wide program using quality improvement methodology. 

    Objectives:
    Identify the unique needs of patients with developmental disabilities and behavioral challenges in the health care setting.
    List specific strategies that have been shown to be effective when working with this population.
    Describe how to implement a program to address the complex needs of these children using electronic medical records and other resources available.
    Increase awareness of the challenges and barriers to implementing a hospital-wide program of this nature.

  • The Building Blocks of Resilience: Educational, Individual, and Workplace Strategies for Constructing Professional Well-Being

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Participants will be able to recognize the potential effects of child life work on personal and professional life. In addition, participants will be able to explore strategies to strengthen and support their own resiliency and discuss efforts to create positive change both individually and within their organization

    Participants will be able to recognize the potential effects of child life work on personal and professional life. In addition, participants will be able to explore strategies to strengthen and support their own resiliency and discuss efforts to create positive change both individually and within their organization. Lastly, the audience will be able to understand strategies to cultivate compassion satisfaction and nurture vicarious resilience. 

    Objectives:
    Explore the potential effects of child life work on personal and professional life.
    Explore strategies to strengthen and support their own resiliency and discuss efforts to create positive change within an organization.
    Understand strategies to nurture vicarious resilience.

  • "They Don't Believe my Pain is Real": Improving Care for Patients with Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    Somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) are a group of mental health disorders occurring in all patient populations. Typically considered outside of the child life scope of practice, child life specialists can play an instrumental role in streamlining support and diagnosis. Participants will learn how to recognize SSRD through the child life assessment, adapt care plans, and create resources to improve patient care and benefit hospitals fiscally. Learning Objectives: Discuss factors that indicate that a patient may have somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) when completing a child life assessment. Explore a modified child life care plan which supports patients with suspected or diagnosed SSRD. Examine how the child life role on the interdisciplinary team improves optimal patient care for SSRD and benefits the hospital system-wide.

    Somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) are a group of mental health disorders occurring in all patient populations. Typically considered outside of the child life scope of practice, child life specialists can play an instrumental role in streamlining support and diagnosis. Participants will learn how to recognize SSRD through the child life assessment, adapt care plans, and create resources to improve patient care and benefit hospitals fiscally. Learning

    Objectives:
    Discuss factors that indicate that a patient may have somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) when completing a child life assessment.
    Explore a modified child life care plan which supports patients with suspected or diagnosed SSRD.
    Examine how the child life role on the interdisciplinary team improves optimal patient care for SSRD and benefits the hospital system-wide. 

  • Catheters, Flushes, Ostomies, Oh My!: Providing Psychosocial Interventions for the Colorectal and Urology Population

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    ​This presentation shares how a child life specialist supports patients and families of the colorectal population, in an inpatient and outpatient setting. Common diagnoses, bowel/urological regimens, and specific therapeutic interventions to promote the coping and understanding of clinical and surgical treatments will be reviewed.

    This presentation shares how a child life specialist supports patients and families of the colorectal population, in an inpatient and outpatient setting. Common diagnoses, bowel/urological regimens, and specific therapeutic interventions to promote the coping and understanding of clinical and surgical treatments will be reviewed. These interventions are founded in medical play and adaptable across diverse and international patient populations.

    Objectives:
    Describe the psychosocial needs of patients with invasive surgical procedures.
    Identify common colorectal diagnoses and options to promote bowel and urinary management.
    Learn and utilize various therapeutic interventions to promote coping, education, and normalization for this population and ways to adapt with other populations.

  • Child Life Services From Afar: An Educational and Resource-based Program to Support Adult Units in Supporting Children of Adult Patients at End of Life

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    Children of adult patients at end of life is a growing area for child life services. This presentation explains the process and benefits of a program implemented to support children of adult patients at end of life without a child life position

    Children of adult patients at end of life is a growing area for child life services. This presentation explains the process and benefits of a program implemented to support children of adult patients at end of life without a child life position. Collaboration, education, and resources are highlighted as key components of the program, including statistics of program success.

    Objectives:
    Assess the need for prioritizing child life support for children of adult patients at end of life within a clinical setting.
    Explore techniques on appropriate education for adult unit staff regarding best practices when offering support and resources to families for children experiencing end of life.
    Discuss various age appropriate resources and community organizations to assist in providing ongoing support of children experiencing death, dying, and grief.

  • Is Parenting and Child Development Universal?: How Research on Parenting Influences Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    ​Cultural norms about parenting practices strongly dictate how parents raise their children and can influence the acceptance, delivery, and effectiveness of parenting program interventions.

    Cultural norms about parenting practices strongly dictate how parents raise their children and can influence the acceptance, delivery, and effectiveness of parenting program interventions. This study sought to investigate parental knowledge, attitudes and practices among Arab parents in Qatar, identify knowledge practice gaps in order to develop a culturally sensitive parenting program, and determine the best delivery design for parenting programs. 

    Objectives:
    Define the culture studied including the challenges of research within the culture.
    Compare parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the studied culture and western cultures.
    Identify knowledge practice gaps that benefit from culturally sensitive parenting resources.

  • Growth Oriented Feedback: Methods for Making it Meaningful

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    ​Feedback is an essential component of teaching and learning. The provision of meaningful, growth-oriented feedback has benefits for students, supervisors, academicians, as well as children, youth, and families

    Feedback is an essential component of teaching and learning. The provision of meaningful, growth-oriented feedback has benefits for students, supervisors, academicians, as well as children, youth, and families. Evidence will be applied to daily practice in this demonstration and discussion based session to enhance understanding of and increase participants confidence in the feedback process as it relates to clinical training. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss components and qualities of effective feedback and the evidence to support practice
    Discuss common barriers to providing effective feedback and the impact of ineffective feedback.
    Explore specific prompts, wording suggestions, and practices for delivery of effective feedback

  • Behavioral Approaches to Dental Care for Patients with Developmental and Behavioral Disabilities

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    ​Children with autism and other developmental disabilities often have behaviors and sensitivities that make dental treatment one of the most difficult types of healthcare for them to receive

    Children with autism and other developmental disabilities often have behaviors and sensitivities that make dental treatment one of the most difficult types of healthcare for them to receive. Follow a pediatric dental team of a child life specialist and hygienist to learn strategies and adaptations to best provide support for patients with developmental and behavioral conditions in pediatric dentistry. 

    Objectives:
    Explore the need for child life services in pediatric dentistry, including current evidence-based need for individualizing healthcare for patients with developmental delays, as well as challenging and aggressive behaviors.
    Discuss how interdisciplinary collaboration, when combined with supportive interventions, leads to increased positive outcomes for patients, families, and the dental team.
    Explore child life techniques can be adapted for use with children with special needs and challenging behaviors in the healthcare setting to minimize distress and maximize coping during dental encounters.
    Discuss how to enhance their confidence and competence when providing services for patients with developmental delays and challenging behaviors.