2020 Child Life Conference On-Demand Package

  • Registration Closed

This exclusive member's only package provides access to all of the on-demand content from our 2020 Child Life Annual Conference. Participants of this package will gain access to webinars across all exam domains, and earn over 40 PDUs.  Price: $299.00

All participants  will retain access to content for one year from the date of purchase. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1.5 PDU's - This webinar will explore the family systems perspective and parenting practices. Recording date: 2019

    This webinar will explore the family systems perspective and parenting practices. We will discuss the concept of meta-parenting (how parents think about their parenting), and further investigate how parenting practices or meta-parenting might be different for the parents of children in the hospital. We will explore what factors might contribute to parenting differences and what the implications of parenting differences might be for children and families. We will conclude by discussing how child life can potentially educate, or play a role in supporting families, parents and children.

    This webinar is derived from a Focus article. 

    Learning Objectives:

    -Successfully connect and apply the family systems perspective, specifically to parents and children in a healthcare setting.

    -Correctly describe and asses the commonly known types of parenting styles and outcomes of these styles as noted in the literature.

    -Clearly identify and discuss the meta-parenting concept, and related research findings regarding meta-parenting.

    -Accurately identify and assess potential parenting "risk factors" for parents of hospitalized children or parents of children with chronic illness.
    Effectively articulate and debate the implications of parenting differences for children and families.

    -Confidently recommend and facilitate education or intervention to support the psychosocial needs and well-being of children and families.

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1.5 PDU's

    Elizabeth McCarroll

    PhD, CCLS

    Elizabeth McCarroll a MS and PhD in Human Development and Family Studies, with an emphasis on childhood. Elizabeth became a CCLS in 2009, and her research interests have always centered on social and emotional development in preschool/school- age children and how health status might influence those relationships. More recently Liz has started looking at how parents of children with chronic illness might parent their children differently, and how those differences might influence the social and emotional development of their children.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1.5 PDU's - Engaging in difficult conversations is not solely about having the “right” words; it’s about how compassion, perspective, and words work together to create meaningful conversations.

    Engaging in difficult conversations is not solely about having the “right” words; it’s about how compassion, perspective, and words work together to create meaningful conversations. This webinar will focus on empowering professionals to feel equipped when navigating sensitive discussions with families at end of life. Through case examples and personal experiences from bereaved parents, effective child life and communication strategies will be explored.

    After this webinar, participants will have:

    an increased ability to identify and process difficult conversations related to children and families’ experiences at end of life

    additional knowledge on how to initiate conversations with a child and their family independently or collaboratively with a support team

    expanded insight on how joint efforts within a palliative care team benefit the child and their family

    further information regarding the role and responsibilities of the child life specialist when working with children and families at end of life

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1.5 PDU's 

    Jennifer Smith

    MS, CCLS, CIMI

    Jennifer Smith earned her BS and MS in human development and family studies with a concentration in child life from The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL. She completed her undergraduate child life internship at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, TN, and her graduate child life internship at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN.  She began her career at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, where she worked for 6 years.  Jennifer is a currently a Child Life Specialist III providing child life services for patients and families in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, where she has worked for 11 years.  She is an integral member of the Quality of Life Team and the Quality of Life Bereaved Parent Mentor Steering Committee.  

    Ashley Carr

    CCLS

    Ashley Carr, CCLS, earned her Bachelor of Science in Child and Family Studies with an emphasis in child life from The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Ashley became a Certified Child Life Specialist in May 2006 and began her career at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN where she has worked for 14 years.  Ashley is a Child Life Specialist III providing child life services to patients receiving bone marrow transplants and cellular therapy in the inpatient unit an. She serves as a member of the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit Council, is a departmental clinical supervision facilitator, and serves as a liaison for the quality of life interdisciplinary team meetings. Ashley recently contributed to and published an article in the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology titled “Matched Marrow, Sibling Shadow: The Epidemiology, Experience, and Ethics of Sibling Donors of Stem Cells”. Ashley has extensive experience as an active planning committee member of Schwartz Center Rounds and Clinical Supervision in which she has contributed to a culture shift change within her institution. 


  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1.5 PDU's - Supporting teens and their families when a parent has a serious or terminal illness requires specific knowledge and skills.

    Supporting teens and their families when a parent has a serious or terminal illness requires specific knowledge and skills. Current research will be highlighted with focus given to the distinctive characteristics of the teenage brain, including what teens need and want related to support during a parental illness, anticipated death, or sudden unexpected loss.  Specific communication techniques for professionals to use with teens and to coach parents to use with their teen will be provided. In addition, time will be spent on helpful activities that engage teens and allow them to express feelings, strengthen positive coping skills and work through challenges of bereavement. 

    After this webinar, participants will have:

    a familiarity with the teenage brain and behaviors, noting differences between males and females

    an increased knowledge of ways to relate to teenagers, including how parents and professionals can improve communication with teens

    new therapeutic activity ideas to engage teenagers in understanding illness, expressing feelings, and building helpful coping tools

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1.5 PDU's

    Meredith Cooper

    MA, CCLS, LPC

    Former Executive Director and Co-Founder of  Wonders & Worries, envisioned, launched and grew the organization from its beginnings in 2001. Following 15 years of success, Meredith stepped into a founder role in 2017, where she continues providing strategic direction for national growth. Meredith has a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in Child Development. She is a certified Child Life Specialist and a Licensed Professional Counselor who has been involved with children’s healthcare in the Austin community for more than 25 years, including being the first pediatric oncology child life specialist for Austin. She is the chair of the standards and guidelines sub-committee for the ACLP Community Based Non-Traditional Role Committee. 

    Kim Fryar

    MS, MEd, CCLS, NCC

    Kim Fryar has been a child life specialist for more than 25 years. She started her career at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, where she worked with seriously ill children and their families for nine years. Kim moved to Austin and joined the Wonders & Worries team in 2002. Kim now serves as one of two program directors, a role that gives her the privilege of providing initial support to newly referred families, supervising child life staff members, and overseeing client services. Kim holds a bachelor’s degree in Family Relations and Child Development and Masters’ degrees in both Human Development and Family Studies and Counseling – with a play therapy emphasis. She is a certified Child Life Specialist and National Certified Counselor (NCC).

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Domain: Professional Responsibility; 1.5 PDU's - As child life specialists who’ve practiced for several years know, beyond the bubbles, arts and crafts, and special events that make the job of a child life specialist appear “so fun!”

    As child life specialists who’ve practiced for several years know, beyond the bubbles, arts and crafts, and special events that make the job of a child life specialist appear “so fun!” to outsiders lies a truly unique and often challenging role. Working in a caring profession over time can take its toll on an employee. The impacts of working as a child life specialist have been studied since the early 1990s and include potential for burnout, compassion fatigue, and emotional labor. Research in other psychosocial-focused and/or medical professions has shown the relationship between these variables of professional well-being and career longevity. This presentation is intended to bring awareness of factors that may impact the career longevity of a child life specialist and encourage the exploration of professional sustainability practices.

    Participants will be able to:

    -Review current literature on professional well-bring among child life specialists
    -Explore factors that may influence career longevity among child life specialists
    -Identify practices to promote professional sustainability

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility; 1.5 PDU's

    This webinar is a part of our Established Professional programming. 

    Nicole Tanghe, MA, CCLS,

    Nicole Tanghe, MA, CCLS, is a Child Life Specialist III at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She currently works with pediatric patients and their families within the lung transplant program. Her interest in career longevity developed from a personal interest in resiliency and burnout. Nicole serves as a mentor to new staff in the Division of Child Life and Integrative Care and is a clinical supervision facilitator. Nicole was a participant of the ACLP’s inaugural Leadership Academy class in 2015 and is the current Chair-Elect of the ACLP’s Mentor Program Subcommittee.

    Courtney Dill

    MS, CCLS, LMT

    Courtney Dill, MS, CCLS, LMT is a child life specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She is currently working the capacity of training coordinator, where she guides practicum, intern and cooperative students in the Department of Child Life, Education and Creative Arts. Courtney's interest include promoting well being and alternative healthcare.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1 PDU - The implications of technology use on development are still largely variable. Child life specialists often utilize technology in interventions to normalize the hospital environment or to provide diversion from stressful experiences

    The implications of technology use on development are still largely variable. Child life specialists often utilize technology in interventions to normalize the hospital environment or to provide diversion from stressful experiences. This presentation provides an educational resource discussing the implications of technology use in order to promote positive development and family-centered experiences for hospitalized youth.

    Objectives:
    Describe the ways in which technology impacts cognitive, physical and psychosocial development for children and adolescents.
    Assess how hospitalization and illness relate to technology use and youth development.
    Utilize an educational resource with tips for optimizing technology use with hospitalized youth.

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1 PDU

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1 PDU - Organ transplantation is a life-saving attempt requiring chronic care and surveillance for comorbidities. This presentation will examine the challenges faced by children and families experiencing heart and/or lung transplantation

    Organ transplantation is a life-saving attempt requiring chronic care and surveillance for comorbidities. This presentation will examine the challenges faced by children and families experiencing heart and/or lung transplantation. Equipped with ongoing assessment and awareness of the unique circumstances of organ transplantation, child life specialists are better prepared to meet the ever changing needs of children and families throughout the transplant journey.

    Objectives:
    Understand the impact of organ transplantation, identify common reactions of patients and families, and explore supportive interventions to utilize for emotional processing.
    Explore the components of a transplant-specific child life assessment and factors that may influence coping.
    Identify potential transplant-related complications and associated interventions to support patients and families.

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1 PDU

    Nicole Tanghe

    MA, CCLS

    Nicole Tanghe MA, CCLS, has been a Certified Child Life Specialist for ten years and currently works as a Child Life Specialist III within the lung transplant program at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She established child life services in the lung transplant program at CCHMC and is the child life representative on the medical center's interdisciplinary Transplant Information Program Sharing (iTIPS) committee. She serves as a mentor and preceptor to new employees within the Division of Child Life and Integrative Care, a clinical supervision facilitator, and is an evidence-based practice project mentor to child life interns. Nicole is the current chair-elect of the ACLP Mentor Program subcommittee. Nicole is an adjunct instructor at Northern Kentucky University for a children and families in healthcare course.


    Jenna Yarnell

    MS, CCLS

    Jenna Yarnell is a Certified Child Life Specialist at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Jenna has been a CCLS for seven years, primarily working with patients in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, cardiac step down unit and emergency department. She recently transitioned to her role as the child life educator, supporting patients throughout the hospital while specializing in patients with behavioral health needs. Jenna is passionate about patient safety and co-leads the hospital’s Safety Advocate Program.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​DOMAIN: Assessment; 1.5 PDU's - This presentation will shed light on the parental beliefs and behaviors regarding youth self management of cystic fibrosis and transition to adulthood.

    This presentation will shed light on the parental beliefs and behaviors regarding youth self management of cystic fibrosis and transition to adulthood.  Current findings from a study completed with parents and youth regarding transition to adulthood will be discussed.

    Objectives:
    Report study findings of parental beliefs and behaviors concerning self management. Brainstorm ways to address skills in their interactions with patients/families.
    Demonstrate knowledge of issues related to transitioning/self-management with a focus on parents.
    Understand self-management related stressors and skills of parents.

    DOMAIN: Assessment; 1.5 PDU's 

    Jessica Oviatt

    Doctoral candidate, MA, MEd, CCLS

    Jessica is a doctoral candidate in the School of Education at University of California Irvine and is currently finishing her dissertation. Her dissertation work is a descriptive study on what parents of youth with cystic fibrosis are thinking about and doing in terms of preparing their children to manage their health as adults. She is also part of another research study, where she is interviewing parents of younger children with cystic fibrosis. This interview data will then be used by the other team members to create and validate a measure of stress and strength and resilience in parenting a youth with CF. Jessica is also a part time faculty member at California State University Fullerton where she teaches a range of courses in the Child and Adolescent Studies department and more specifically the child life theory and practice course. She maintains her child life certification and plans to continue to conduct research in the area of child life and/or youth with chronic illness.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​DOMAIN: Intervention; 1 PDU - Child life specialists are in the unique position to facilitate legacy building in healthcare settings.

    Child life specialists are in the unique position to facilitate legacy building in healthcare settings. Due to medical advancements, many pediatric patients receive care from outpatient services, providing the opportunity for legacy building interventions to occur outside of the traditional hospital environment. Attendees will gain insight into the definition of legacy and how to integrate legacy building interventions in an outpatient clinic setting.

    Objectives:
    Define legacy and explore opportunities for legacy promotion within the pediatric hospital setting.
    Understand how legacy building can affect coping with medical experiences.
    Provide a framework to incorporate legacy building opportunities in an outpatient setting.
    Understand barriers and misconceptions regarding legacy building in an outpatient clinic setting.

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1 PDU 

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1 PDU - Patients with chronic illness often struggle with adhering to their treatment regimens.

    Patients with chronic illness often struggle with adhering to their treatment regimens. This presentation will introduce two incentive programs used to empower patients to adhere to dietary restrictions and medications. It will include how the programs were designed and implemented, data management, interdisciplinary collaboration, and patient involvement. Ideas for using incentive programs with other patient populations will be introduced.

    Objectives:

    Understand the difference between adherence and compliance and be able to list three reasons why chronic pediatric patients may not adhere to their medical regimens.
    Understand the premise of each incentive program used by the authors and identify the steps taken to initiate and maintain each one.
    Define key behavioral analysis terms presented and describe how they are applicable to child life practice and incentive programs in particular.
    List potential applications for incentive programs in other chronic patient populations.

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1 PDU

    Robyn Snyder

    MS, CCLS

    Robyn has a Bachelor's degree in Special Education from Boston University, and a Master's degree in Behavioral Education (Applied Behavior Analysis) from Simmons College. Before ever hearing about child life, Robyn was a special education teacher and a behavior specialist in school settings. Robyn has been a child life specialist for 16 years, and has worked at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH) for the past 12 years. She has worked with patients in intensive care, the emergency department, the dialysis unit, and the cleft lip/palate and craniofacial clinics while at BCH. Prior to that, she completed her internship and then worked on a neuroscience unit and an endocrinology/clinical research unit at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. In her free time, Robyn enjoys spending time with her family and friends, taking walks, playing board/card/tile games, and traveling.

    LaKeisha Garcia

    MS, CCLS

    LaKeisha Garcia is a Certified Child Life Specialist at Boston Children's Hospital. She received her Bachelor's degree in Child Development from Tufts University and her Master's Degree in Child Life and Family-Centered Care from Wheelock College. She has worked at Boston Children's for the past 14 years in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit, the Infant/Toddler Surgical Unit and most recently, for the past 8 years, on the Dialysis Unit. In her free time, LaKeisha enjoys spending time with her husband and three children. She also loves connecting with friends, serving in her church community, reading/listening to a good book, taking cruises and watching reality dance shows, HGTV, and the Food Network.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1 PDU - ​Evidence shows that siblings psychosocial functioning is impacted when a brother or sister is faced with a life-threatening illness.

    Evidence shows that siblings psychosocial functioning is impacted when a brother or sister is faced with a life-threatening illness. Through numerous interventions both inside and outside of the hospital, child life specialists can play an essential role facilitating siblings coping and understanding. This session will equip participants to effectively assess and provide appropriate child life support for siblings.

    Objectives:
    Participants will be able to apply evidence-based research regarding sibling psychosocial needs to clinical practice.
    Participants will be able to identify therapeutic child life interventions based on the siblings developmental needs, temperament, and experiences.
    Participants will be able to educate and empower parents in identifying the coping needs of their childs siblings, both beside and away from the clinical environment.
    Participants will gain insight to the important practice of sibling advocacy throughout medical experiences.

    DOMAIN: Intervention; 1 PDU

    Katy Hoskins

    CCLS

    Katy Hoskins, CCLS is a Certified Child Life Specialist in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, TN. Her interests and advocacy centers around infant mental health, non-pharmacological pain management/procedural support for infants, prenatal psychosocial support for parents and siblings in Maternal Fetal medicine, preterm developmental needs, program development in Neonatology, and family-centered end of life care. Katy has been a child life specialist for almost five years with previous clinical experience in the emergency department and inpatient neurology at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, TN. She graduated in 2015 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Ecology with a concentration in Child Life and will begin pursuing her Masters degree in Early Childhood and Family Development at Missouri State University this fall. Katy serves on many hospital committees, including chair of the NICU Bereavement Committee, and is also an ACLP Bulletin committee member.

    Allie Leidy

    MA, CCLS

    Allie Leidy, MA, CCLS is a Certified Child Life Specialist working with the hematology/oncology population at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee. She has been a child life specialist for three years. Her educational background includes a Bachelor of Science degree in human development and family studies from The Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pennsylvania and a Master of Arts degree in child life from The University of Akron.