2022 Child Life Virtual Conference

You will be able to participate in the Child Life Virtual Conference from any location and at times that best work with your schedule. Earn up to 15 PDUs in a variety of content domains.

 

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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Opening session and keynote speaker for the 2022 Child Life Conference 1.5 PDUs, Professional Responsibility Domain

    Opening session and keynote speaker for the 2022 Child Life Conference

    1.5 PDUs, Professional Responsibility Domain

    Dr. Linda McGhee

    Linda McGhee is a clinical psychologist, attorney and nationally recognized mental health expert and speaker. McGhee has been featured in the Washington Post, New York Times, Huffington Post, and Grown and Flown. She hosts “Good Mental Health on Radio One” which raises awareness around mental health.  She is a regular contributor to the Son Rise Project,  an Oprah Winfrey Network podcast that supports families of black teenagers and young adults with mental illness.   McGhee act as a mental health expert for the Steve Fund, an organization devoted to mental health for college students of color.  She has recently provided for Washingtonian magazine commentary on the intersection of racial trauma, COVID-19 and the mass protests. She has served on the clinical faculty at the Washington School of Psychiatry and is a former Adjunct Professor at George Washington University and the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.   McGhee currently serves as the President of the Maryland Psychological Association.  She is a compassionate leader who seeks to bridge differences and shed light.  Her strength lies in her ability to promote healthy discussions on sensitive issues. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Though grief is Though grief is very personal, it may also be a shared experience requiring support and coping interventions on a community level. This session will describe the creation and implementation of a school-based teach-the-teacher model for grief education and support in the wake of the global pandemic, highlighting practical, hands-on creative coping interventions that can be used in a classroom, individual or small group setting. Objectives: Participants will be able to define different types of grief. Explore the utilization of coping skills and activities across different disciplines including music, art, writing and mindfulness. Describe key components in a school-based initiative supporting educators and students. 1.5 PDUs Suggested Domain: Interventionvery personal, it may also be a shared experience requiring support and coping interventions on a community level. This session will describe the creation and implementation of a school-based teach-the-teacher model for grief education and support in the wake of the global pandemic, highlighting practical, hands-on creative coping interventions that can be used in a classroom, individual or small group setting. Objectives: Participants will be able to define different types of grief. Explore the utilization of coping skills and activities across different disciplines including music, art, writing and mindfulness. Describe key components in a school-based initiative supporting educators and students. 1.5 PDUs Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Though grief is very personal, it may also be a shared experience requiring support and coping interventions on a community level. This session will describe the creation and implementation of a school-based teach-the-teacher model for grief education and support in the wake of the global pandemic, highlighting practical, hands-on creative coping interventions that can be used in a classroom, individual or small group setting.

    Objectives:

    Participants will be able to define different types of grief.

    Explore the utilization of coping skills and activities across different disciplines including music, art, writing and mindfulness.

    Describe key components in a school-based initiative supporting educators and students.

    1.5 PDUs
    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Laura Moore

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    The Harbor Lights Foundation

    Laura Moore, EdD, CHES, CCLS brings extensive experience and a strong passion for supporting children, teens and families whose lives have been touched by illness and loss of a loved one. Her first job found her working on a pediatric oncology unit where she recognized the importance of combining emotional support, education and creative activities to create an environment where children, teens and families can relax and be themselves. Her experience in the past 20 years has included hospital, school and not-for-profit settings. Laura’s academic areas of focus include health education, health psychology, emotional support, program design, curriculum development and research design. Laura holds a Doctorate in Health and Behavior from Teacher’s College, Columbia University and is certified as a Health Educator, Child Life Specialist and in Pediatric Grief and Bereavement.

    Anna Powers

    Licensed Master Social Worker

    The Harbor Lights Foundation

    Just after receiving her Masters in Social Work degree from Columbia University, Anna went to work for Gilda’s Club/Westchester, providing individual counseling, facilitating support groups, and completing intakes in the internationally-renowned organization’s ‘Children, Teens, and Families Program.’ Previously, she completed an internship as a clinical social worker at Stamford Hospital’s Bennett Cancer Center. There, she counseled both patients and family members, and worked collaboratively with hospital staff to implement a holistic approach to the treatment of cancer, addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of patients. Anna’s interest in working with children began at Wellesley College, where she interned at the campus’ experimental preschool. During her tenure as an elementary school teacher, Anna became acutely aware of the importance of emotional support for families dealing with serious health issues. Additionally, Anna has facilitated support sessions in schools around mindfulness, coping skills, and developmentally-appropriate psychoeducation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Research focuses on the value of engaging in self-reflective and collaborative practice as a child life professional. This poster presentation describes the way one child life team collaborated, researched, and implemented an adaptation of a system-wide huddle policy based on the known needs of their specific department to foster team collaboration, enhance team cohesion, and create a sense of accountability by engaging in vulnerability to better meet hospital wide psychosocial needs. Learning Objectives: Describe the importance of a daily team huddle within the healthcare workplace environment. Identify goals of a daily child life team huddle. Learn about the creation, implementation, and evaluation of a daily team huddle at this author’s institution. Identify steps towards implementation of a daily team huddle unique to their child life program/department. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    Research focuses on the value of engaging in self-reflective and collaborative practice as a child life professional. This poster presentation describes the way one child life team collaborated, researched, and implemented an adaptation of a system-wide huddle policy based on the known needs of their specific department to foster team collaboration, enhance team cohesion, and create a sense of accountability by engaging in vulnerability to better meet hospital wide psychosocial needs.

    Learning Objectives:

    Describe the importance of a daily team huddle within the healthcare workplace environment.

    Identify goals of a daily child life team huddle.

    Learn about the creation, implementation, and evaluation of a daily team huddle at this author’s institution.

    Identify steps towards implementation of a daily team huddle unique to their child life program/department.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    Hailey Simpson

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    This speaker graduated with a masters degree from The University of Georgia, and completed her Child Life Clinical Internship at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta in Cardiology and Inpatient Oncology. Following completion of her internship, she was hired as the Certified Child Life Specialist for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Egleston. For the past four years, she has worked in the NICU focusing her day-to-day efforts on meeting the developmental and psychosocial needs of infants and their families. Throughout her career this speaker has focused her efforts on increasing support for hospitalized infants by advocating on their behalf to meet their needs specifically within the realm of procedural support and end of life care.

    Stephanie Whitten

    MS, CCLS

    The University of Alabama & Southern New Hampshire University

    Stephanie Whitten is an adjunct instructor at the University of Alabama and academic advisor for Southern New Hampshire University. Her educational background includes a Bachelor's of Science degree and Master's of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies with an emphasis in Child Life from the University of Alabama. Stephanie has been a Certified Child Life Specialist (CCLS) for almost nine years, which includes her time as a Child Life Specialist II at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Her clinical experience spans across oncology, neurology, and emergency/trauma populations and settings. Stephanie recently left the clinical setting to expand on her career in higher education where she enjoys applying her experiences as a clinical CCLS and helping her students learn and grow.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Encouraging parents to read to their newborns can influence positive behaviors that may continue beyond discharge. Shared reading after breastfeeding, or during skin to skin creates a positive developmental experience for the newborn. Storytime Snuggles, is a reading program championed by a collaborative effort between one child life specialist, Family Council, and NICU team. Through this program, books are made available in the NICU for families to read to their baby. Learning Objectives: Discuss the benefits of reading in the NICU. Share methods of initiating a reading program in the NICU. Identify strategies used for data collection, barriers, and successes. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Encouraging parents to read to their newborns can influence positive behaviors that may continue beyond discharge. Shared reading after breastfeeding, or during skin to skin creates a positive developmental experience for the newborn. Storytime Snuggles, is a reading program championed by a collaborative effort between one child life specialist, Family Council, and NICU team. Through this program, books are made available in the NICU for families to read to their baby.

    Learning Objectives:

    Discuss the benefits of reading in the NICU.

    Share methods of initiating a reading program in the NICU.

    Identify strategies used for data collection, barriers, and successes.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Joanne Ordono

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    Joanne has been a certified child life specialist for 21 years and is an active member of the Association of Child Life Professionals (ACLP).  Although her specialization is in hematology oncology and grief and bereavement, she also works in critical care and trauma setting at Cedars-Sinai.  Most recently, she started providing support in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.  She supports patients and families by providing health education, therapeutic play and end-of-life support.  Joanne is passionate about providing education to future child life specialists as well as other members of the healthcare team, which include medical students, interns and residents as well as nursing students, social workers, chaplains, etc., on the unique needs of children and their families during hospitalization as well as through grief.  She also plays an active role in advocating and implementing Patient and Family Centered Care.  Most recently, Joanne became a member of the National Alliance for Children’s Grief (NACG) to be able to connect with other professionals and to stay up-to-date about children’s grief.

    Amanda Williams

    MSN, CNS, ACCNS-N, RNC-NIC

    Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    Amanda Williams is a Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Amanda has been a neonatal nurse for over ten years and has always been passionate about providing family centered and developmentally appropriate care to newborns. She has a talent for providing education to nurses, families, and other members of the care team. Additionally, Amanda is interested in quality improvement through simulation and has developed many high fidelity simulation experiences for her team which has allowed her to improve systems that influence patient care. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    More knowledge is needed about primary care providers’ (PCPs’) abilities to provide family-centered care and deliver services that align with the child life competencies. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which parents of autistic and neurotypical children are satisfied with their PCPs’ abilities to provide family-centered care and with their skills related to the child life competencies. Learning Objectives: Learn the research related to this study, including the unique challenges that primary health care settings present for autistic children. Learn how parents responses to the measures. Understand the type of analysis used and how the results were interpreted. For instance, participants will understand the extent to which parents of autistic and neurotypical children are satisfied with their PCPs' abilities to provide family-centered care. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Intervention

    More knowledge is needed about primary care providers’ (PCPs’) abilities to provide family-centered care and deliver services that align with the child life competencies. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which parents of autistic and neurotypical children are satisfied with their PCPs’ abilities to provide family-centered care and with their skills related to the child life competencies.

    Learning Objectives:

    Learn the research related to this study, including the unique challenges that primary health care settings present for autistic children.

    Learn how parents responded to the measures.

    Understand the type of analysis used and how the results were interpreted. For instance, participants will understand the extent to which parents of autistic and neurotypical children are satisfied with their PCPs' abilities to provide family-centered care.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Amber Aparicio

    MS, CCLS

    Elizabeth Seton Children's Center

    Amber Aparicio works as a Certified Child Life Specialist at Elizabeth Seton Children's Center in Yonkers, NY. She also has three years of experience leading recreation programs for autistic children and adults.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Maintaining Sibling Bonds During an Involuntary Separation The sibling relationship is one of the longest relationship experienced by children and reflects a complex/intimate bond. Therefore, when siblings are separated, the impacts are profound. The balancing grief and survival model offers a lens through which to view siblings’ unique experiences of grief and coping during their separation. As well, expressions of continuing bonds and the 5C’s can be utilized to maintain sibling relationships and support siblings’ psychosocial needs. Learning Objectives: Identify strengths of the sibling-child relationship, including various protective factors. Recognize and consider the range of vulnerabilities, grief experiences and impacts to “normal” life that well children experience when they are separated from their sibling due to hospitalization or admission into a rehabilitation setting. View children’s complex experiences, stressors and coping strategies during an involuntary separation from their ill sibling (due to hospitalization or an admission into a rehabilitation setting) through the balancing grief and survival model. Critically examine continuing bonds to support the maintenance of the integral sibling bond and facilitate coping. Discover developmentally appropriate strategies for psychosocial support through the use of expressions of continuing bonds and individualized communication/care plans for well siblings. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Assessment/Intervention

    Maintaining Sibling Bonds During an Involuntary Separation

    The sibling relationship is one of the longest relationship experienced by children and reflects a complex/intimate bond. Therefore, when siblings are separated, the impacts are profound. The balancing grief and survival model offers a lens through which to view siblings’ unique experiences of grief and coping during their separation. As well, expressions of continuing bonds and the 5C’s can be utilized to maintain sibling relationships and support siblings’ psychosocial needs.

    Learning Objectives:

    Identify strengths of the sibling-child relationship, including various protective factors.

    Recognize and consider the range of vulnerabilities, grief experiences and impacts to “normal” life that well children experience when they are separated from their sibling due to hospitalization or admission into a rehabilitation setting.

    View children’s complex experiences, stressors and coping strategies during an involuntary separation from their ill sibling (due to hospitalization or an admission into a rehabilitation setting) through the balancing grief and survival model.

    Critically examine continuing bonds to support the maintenance of the integral sibling bond and facilitate coping.

    Discover developmentally appropriate strategies for psychosocial support through the use of expressions of continuing bonds and individualized communication/care plans for well siblings.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Assessment/Intervention

    Melissa Christina Dodaro

    BASc., ECS, MSc, CLPPC

    McMaster University

    Melissa Dodaro is a Certified Child Life Specialist with her Master’s degree from McMaster University in Child Life and Pediatric Psychosocial Care. She also has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Early Childhood Studies and Diploma in Early Childhood Education from the University of Guelph-Humber. Melissa is a practicing child life specialist, serving children and their families, in both hospital and community settings. Melissa specializes in child development and is an advocate for family-centered care and strengths-based approaches. Melissa is passionate about supporting children, adolescents, and families experiencing significant life changes and losses, through serious illness, death, and non-death related losses (such as sibling separation).

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    As technology continues to change the world around us, child life specialists must utilize these advancements to provide relevant and unique legacy building opportunities for families. This child life department utilizes a standard craft store computer controlled cutting machine to provide unique legacy building opportunities, create priceless keepsakes for families. These include but are not limited to art from combining video along with sound and heartbeat waves, handwriting, drawings, etc. Learning Objectives: Identify 3 benefits to legacy building interventions. Identify 2 options for standard craft store computer-controlled cutting machines and initial startup cost of purchasing. Name 3 legacy items that can be created with a standard craft store computer controlled cutting machines. Identify materials needed to begin utilizing this technology at their hospital. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    As technology continues to change the world around us, child life specialists must utilize these advancements to provide relevant and unique legacy building opportunities for families. This child life department utilizes a standard craft store computer controlled cutting machine to provide unique legacy building opportunities, create priceless keepsakes for families. These include but are not limited to art from combining video along with sound and heartbeat waves, handwriting, drawings, etc.

    Learning Objectives:

    Identify 3 benefits to legacy building interventions.

    Identify 2 options for standard craft store computer-controlled cutting machines and initial startup cost of purchasing.

    Name 3 legacy items that can be created with a standard craft store computer controlled cutting machines.

    Identify materials needed to begin utilizing this technology at their hospital.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    Rebecca Gordon

    MA, CCLS

    Norton Children's Hospital

    Rebecca serves in a clinical role as a certified child life specialist at Norton Children's Hospital in the surgical services department. In her 3 years as a CCLS, she has found a passion in creating innovative and cost-effective clinical interventions tools for patients and families. Currently, Rebecca is involved at a national level within the ACLP as the chair-elect on the Education and Training Committee. Rebecca's past publication and presentation experience has included topics emphasizing perspectives on student education, virtual reality as a preparation tool, and currently regarding legacy building interventions utilizing cost-effective computer-cutting technology.

    Taryn Johnson

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    Norton Children's Hospital

    Taryn currently serves as the Child Life Coordinator for Norton Children's Hospital. In addition to Coordinator responsibilities, she provides patient care for the inpatient hematology, oncology and renal populations through the Norton Children's Cancer Institute. She also coordinates the internship program. She has an interest in providing support to siblings and helped develop the hospital's sibling support program in 2012. She currently serves as a co-facilitator of the SibStars sibling support program.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This study explored the effectiveness of a training module developed as an educational intervention for nurses in an adult emergency healthcare setting regarding child development milestones, healthcare experiences, and supportive psychosocial care. Paired-samples t-test pre-post analyses (n=30) revealed a statistically significant increase in total knowledge, and knowledge regarding infants, school age children, and adolescents, suggesting the effectiveness of this intervention. Nurses also acknowledged usefulness of modules. Practice and research implications are provided. Learning Objectives: List reasons why seeking care in the emergency department can be especially scary or confusing for a child and family. Describe the components of the educational training module developed for this research toward enhancing knowledge of developmental stages, as well as stressors and coping strategies relevant to each stage (from infancy through adolescence), for nurses working in the emergency department of a community hospital. Explain the key findings of this research, namely that there was a statistically significant increase from pretest to posttest in total knowledge and a statistically significant increase in knowledge for questions regarding infants, school age children, and adolescents. Articulate understanding of the process of collaborating in a community-engaged research project with interdisciplinary healthcare team members, and also recognize the challenges in this type of research. Identify the rationale regarding the theoretical lenses of Erikson’s Theory of Psychosocial Development, Piaget’s stages of Cognitive Development, and Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory used for this study. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    This study explored the effectiveness of a training module developed as an educational intervention for nurses in an adult emergency healthcare setting regarding child development milestones, healthcare experiences, and supportive psychosocial care. Paired-samples t-test pre-post analyses (n=30) revealed a statistically significant increase in total knowledge, and knowledge regarding infants, school age children, and adolescents, suggesting the effectiveness of this intervention. Nurses also acknowledged usefulness of modules.  Practice and research implications are provided.

    Learning Objectives:

    List reasons why seeking care in the emergency department can be especially scary or confusing for a child and family.

    Describe the components of the educational training module developed for this research toward enhancing knowledge of developmental stages, as well as stressors and coping strategies relevant to each stage (from infancy through adolescence), for nurses working in the emergency department of a community hospital.

    Explain the key findings of this research, namely that there was a statistically significant increase from pretest to posttest in total knowledge and a statistically significant increase in knowledge for questions regarding infants, school age children, and adolescents.

    Articulate understanding of the process of collaborating in a community-engaged research project with interdisciplinary healthcare team members, and also recognize the challenges in this type of research.

    Identify the rationale regarding the theoretical lenses of Erikson’s Theory of Psychosocial Development, Piaget’s stages of Cognitive Development, and Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory used for this study.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    Priti Desai

    PhD, MPH, CCLS

    East Carolina University

    Dr. Priti Desai PhD, MPH, CCLS, is an associate professor at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. In addition to teaching her formal academic courses at ECU, Priti has conducted more than 80 child life related presentations and workshops around the world, working as a volunteer leader and educator with organizations including Operation Smile, the K.G. Patel Children's Hospital and CanKids- KidsCan, in India, Kuwait Association for Children in Hospitals, and other organizations. For the ACLP, Priti served as Treasurer of the CLC Board of Directors from 2001 to 2003, and chair of the Diversity Committee from 1997 to 2001. Over the years, she has also served as a member of the Conference Planning Committee, Partnership Committee, Practice Analysis Task Force, Child Life Bill of Rights Task Force, Academic Task Force, International Task Force, and the Research and Scholarship Committee. Priti’s published work includes research and review articles that have appeared in journals based in the U.S. and India, and she has co-authored two chapters appearing in The Handbook of Child Life (2018, 2009). Priti has received ACLP’s Distinguished Service Award in May 2013.

    Paige Lockamon Whitcomb

    MS, CCLS

    Children's Hospital of Richmond

    Paige Whitcomb is a Certified Child Life Specialist and has been practicing as a CCLS since 2018. She received her Bachelors degree in English and Social and Economic Justice from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received her Masters degree from East Carolina University in Human Development and Family Science with a Child Life Emphasis. Paige currently works at VCU Health - The Children's Hospital of Richmond as the Float CCLS providing coverage to various units including Inpatient, Bone Marrow Transplant, Burn, and the Pediatric Emergency Room.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Moral distress can be a serious problem for healthcare workers. At this institution, the child life ethics liaisons and the clinical nurse ethicist offered ethics education and moral distress rounds for the child life department. The goal was to decrease burnout and moral distress for the child life department. Outcomes showed that moral distress fluctuated throughout the year during the COVID-19 pandemic, but participants felt validated because of attending the sessions. Learning Objectives: Discuss strategies for successfully incorporating ethics into the professional development of child life departments. Participants will be empowered to implement ethics education opportunities for own department. Establish ways to leverage data to evaluate the value of providing ethics education and determine areas for focus. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Ethics

    Moral distress can be a serious problem for healthcare workers. At this institution, the child life ethics liaisons and the clinical nurse ethicist offered ethics education and moral distress rounds for the child life department. The goal was to decrease burnout and moral distress for the child life department. Outcomes showed that moral distress fluctuated throughout the year during the COVID-19 pandemic, but participants felt validated because of attending the sessions.

    Learning Objectives:

    Discuss strategies for successfully incorporating ethics into the professional development of child life departments.

    Participants will be empowered to implement ethics education opportunities for own department.

    Establish ways to leverage data to evaluate the value of providing ethics education and determine areas for focus.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Ethics

    Katie Dolif

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    Children's Hospital Colorado

    Katie Dolif is a graduate of Colorado State University and has been working as a Certified Child Life Specialist for 4 years. Katie currently serves as the Pre-Surgery CCLS in the Perioperative Services Center at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Katie’s professional interests include: working with siblings, ethics and parental presents in induction. Katie’s passion stems from her relational work of Child Life and incorporating the patients past experiences into current interventions.

    Jennie Gerson

    Clinical Research Coordinator

    Children's Hospital Colorado

    Jennie Gerson is a graduate of the University of Colorado at Boulder, and has been working as a Clinical Research Coordinator for the Child Life department at Children's Hospital Colorado for 3 years. Jennie has worked on Child Life research studies in several clinical areas including oncology, burn, MRI, and rehab, exploring non-pharmacological pain management, distraction, augmented and virtual reality technologies, procedural preparation and support, trauma debriefing, and medical dog support for hospital staff.

    Brianne Newman

    BS, CCLS

    Children's Hospital Colorado

    Brianne is a graduate from University of San Diego.  Brianne has been working at Children’s Hospital Colorado for 16 years. Brianne has covered PRN, outpatient clinics, surgery and is currently part time in radiology. Brianne has served as a chair on the child life research committee. Brianne is a secondary dog handler working with Galaxy. Brianne is passionate about collaborating with the medical team to provide a positive hospital experience for patients and families.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This poster presentation will explore the stories of child life graduate students and specialists whose own pediatric hospitalization experiences shaped their decisions to become child life specialists. Findings include why participants chose child life over other professions and how participants’ previous experiences with child life informed their approach to working with patients and families. Notably, participants described the challenge of maintaining boundaries with people who reminded them of their own experiences. Learning Objectives: Identify at least one way that the field of child life differentiates from other professions, as noted by study participants. Describe how child life graduate students and specialists have made meaning from their prior hospitalization experiences. Articulate the challenges of maintaining boundaries between one’s personal experiences and professional encounters. 1 PDU Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    This poster presentation will explore the stories of child life graduate students and specialists whose own pediatric hospitalization experiences shaped their decisions to become child life specialists. Findings include why participants chose child life over other professions and how participants’ previous experiences with child life informed their approach to working with patients and families. Notably, participants described the challenge of maintaining boundaries with people who reminded them of their own experiences.

    Learning Objectives:

    Identify at least one way that the field of child life differentiates from other professions, as noted by study participants.

    Describe how child life graduate students and specialists have made meaning from their prior hospitalization experiences.

    Articulate the challenges of maintaining boundaries between one’s personal experiences and professional encounters.

    1 PDU
    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    Lucy Adelson

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    Amanda Ginter

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    Towson University

    Samantha Wilkins

    Certified Child Life Specialist

    University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital