2 new product(s) added recently

FREE For ACLP Members: Webinars & Publications

This package provides free on-demand access to all our open webinars and publications currently offered to members. Registrants of this package will gain access to webinars and publications across several exam domains and have the potential to earn 17.5 PDUs. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Dr. Chambers will review the evidence around the importance of children's pain management and provide examples of evidence-based pain management interventions. In addition, this webinar will introduce SKIP and explain SKIP’s role in supporting evidence-based interventions to clinical practice.

    All children experience pain. Effective treatments exist, but this evidence is not translated into practice, resulting in undertreated and preventable pain. For example, hospitalized children experience an average of six painful medical procedures every 24 hours – over two-thirds of which are done without any pain management even though many simple, cost-effective, evidence-based solutions for procedure pain exist. Only one in four parents reports knowing how to use evidence-based pain management with their children and veterinarians receive five times more training in pain management than their physician counterparts. Poorly managed pain leads to negative short- and long-term health outcomes for children and families and detrimental impacts on the healthcare system. 

    Solutions for Kids in Pain (SKIP) is a knowledge mobilization network based at Dalhousie University and Co-led by the Children’s Healthcare Canada (CHC), SKIP seeks to bridge the gap between current treatment practices and available evidence-based solutions for children's pain in Canadian health institutions. Dr. Chambers will review the evidence around the importance of children's pain management and provide examples of evidence-based pain management interventions. In addition, this webinar will introduce SKIP and explain SKIP’s role in supporting evidence-based interventions to clinical practice.

    Participants will be able to:
    -Demonstrate understanding of the impact of pain relief on children’s medical experiences

    Suggested Domain: Intervention

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    As CCLS we are ethically bound to understand the history of racial oppression in America as well as interrogate whiteness and the connection to healthcare disparities. In so doing, we can take steps to disrupt and dismantle racist systems and strive to be abolitionist CCLS.

    Abolitionists [child life specialists] fight for children they will never meet or see because they are visionaries; (Love, 2020, pg 90). The current cultural climate makes it imperative to not only grow our knowledge and skills in racial consciousness but to be strategic and methodical in thought, communication, and action. By doing nothing we become part of the system that perpetuates racism. As CCLS we are ethically bound to understand the history of racial oppression in America as well as interrogate whiteness and the connection to healthcare disparities. In so doing, we can take steps to disrupt and dismantle racist systems and strive to be abolitionist CCLS. Child life specialists are in a unique position to affect the equity and quality of care that all children and families receive. By critically examining the ways patients and families of color experience healthcare environments through the strengths-based model of Community Cultural Wealth and the ethical lens of the 4 I's of Oppression (Ideological, Institutional, Interpersonal, and individual). CCLS can transform our practice to become co-conspirators, that amplify voices and promote agency of communities of color thus deeply affecting patient and family-centered care towards a more inclusive model.

    LOVE, B. E. T. T. I. N. A. (2020). We Want To Do More Than Survive: abolitionist teaching and the pursuit of educational freedom. S.l.: BEACON.

    Objectives:
    Participants will learn about historical practices affecting patient care, medical decisions, and relationships between providers and recipients of health care.
    Participants will examine whiteness as a way to understand privilege and how one group benefits from the oppression of another.
    Participants will utilize the 17s of Oppression to consider ethical responsibility that deepens ones own knowledge of racial consciousness and implications for clinical practice.
    Participants will use theories of community cultural wealth to develop and consider a strengths-based model of child life practice.Participants learn what it means to be an abolitionist CCLS

    DOMAIN: Ethics
    2 PDUs

    Genevieve Lowry

    MS.Ed, CEIM, CCLS

    Genevieve Lowry began her career as a certified child life specialist working with children diagnosed with chronic and life threatening illness at a major New York Hospital. In 2007 she began a private practice working with families in the community facing a variety of challenges. These experiences and her online platform, The Convenient Classroom where is the co-creator of the Online Child Life Certification Test Preparation course as well as provides professional development to child life and creative arts therapists, led her to consider the work of the child life specialist beyond the hospital. Genevieve has worked at Bank Street College since 2004 as adjunct, Interim Director of the Child Life Program (2015-2016) and currently as Course Instructor and Fieldwork Advisor in the fully online Child Life Program. In these roles Genevieve demonstrates her belief that the philosophical tenets of child life can be applied to other settings and populations leading to innovative programming in communities and coursework at Bank Street. She is particularly interested in the intersection of social justice and health care as well as supporting child life students and professionals to be advocates for social justice. She writes, presents and provides consultation to a variety of organizations both locally and nationally and in 2013 she was recognized by Wheelock College as an alumni fulfilling the college’s mission and philosophy.

    Troy Pinkney-Ragsdale

    MA, CCLS

    Troy is a Certified Child Life Specialist for and has over 25 years of experience in the field of Child Life, including directing several child life programs in the tri-state area. She has served as the Director of the Child Life Masters Program at Bank Street College since 2004, and has taught the following courses: Child Development, Adolescent and Emerging Adulthood, Child Life in Health Care Settings, Children with Special Health Care Needs, and Child Life Administration.

    Troy has been an active member of the Association of Child Life Professionals and has held several leadership positions. Patient and Family Centered Care has been an integral part of her work with children, youth and their families for the last 30 years. She is committed to working with families. During her career, she has worked as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Therapist, Special Educator and as a Certified Child Life Specialist. Throughout her career she remains committed to and advocating for the diverse and unique needs of all patients and their family, supporting their growth and development.

    Rechelle Porter

    CFLC, LMSW, CCLS

    Director of Child Life Services
    New York Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital

    Rechelle D Porter, CCLS, LSW is the Director of Child Life Services and Creative Art Therapies at New York Presbyterian/ Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. She has been a Child Life Specialist for over 25 years in both inpatient pediatric general medicine and oncology units, Ambulatory Surgery and outpatient Hematology and Oncology. Hospital Liaison for Family Advisory Council,  and Internship Coordinator Rechelle has served ACLP Nominating committee, Education, and Training Committee.  She has presented on cultural competencies for child life specialist at regional conferences.  Facilitator for Zero Harm and Empathy training for New York Presbyterian. 


    Deborah Vilas

    MS, CCLS, LMSW

    Deborah Vilas, MS, CCLS, LMSW is a faculty advisor and instructor in the Child Life Program at the Bank Street College of Education in New York City, where she teaches graduate students how to provide meaningful and therapeutic play experiences for hospitalized children. Deborah has worked with children as a child life specialist, preschool teacher and social worker. An author, consultant, blogger and international public speaker, Deborah has presented and taught in Australia, The Philippines, New Zealand, the Czech Republic, Mexico, the Palestinian Territories, and Japan. In 2016, she participated in a panel presentation about child life and technology at the United Nations. In 2014, Deborah represented her profession and her country as a keynote speaker at the first global summit on pediatric psychosocial care in hospitals, addressing delegates from 46 countries on the importance of play for sick and injured children. Her blog www.pediaplay.com reaches followers in 89 countries.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/13/2020

    Join us for a conversation with leaders of color in the fields of child life and diversity, equity, & inclusion

    Join us for a conversation with leaders of color in the fields of child life and diversity, equity, & inclusion

    Learning Objectives: 

    -Name the dominant cultural norms of whiteness and develop a working frame to identify how whiteness operates across systems, structures, and every day. 
    -Critique how the white imagination can operate inside the minds of white child life specialists, specifically through emotional disinvestment, lack of critical understanding of race, and the presence of guilt, shame, and defensiveness. 
    -Review the findings on the impact of racism on child and adolescent health through the lens of critical race theory. 
    -Locate their entrance to the problem of sustaining racial injustice and use this awareness as a catalyst to action.

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility


    Divna Wheelwright

    MA, CCLS

    Divna Wheelwright is the current Manager of Child Life & Creative Arts Therapy at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, an adjunct professor at Nova Southeastern University, and former Director on the ACLP Board of Directors. She also serves as Co-Chair of the Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Task Force and as a member of the Child Life Focus Review Board. Divna believes that leadership begins with one's own world view and hers hinges on social justice. 

    Kia Ferrer

    Certified Child Life Specialist and Momentos Therapy LLC founder, Kia Ferrer, has a passion for treating children with respect and without condescension by providing them with honest information about challenging life events. She uses therapeutic art, dramatic play, and developmentally appropriate education to promote healthy interpretations of difficult circumstances through detailed examinations of these pivotal life-moments. In 2018, Ferrer founded Momentos Therapy LLC in Chicago, Illinois, to fill a need she identified in her work with hospitals, wherein child life services typically stop at discharge. She believes children undergoing medical treatment are entitled to psychosocial support in all the various contexts of their lives. Ferrer has a particular interest in helping children reintegrate into their schools, homes and communities after experiencing illness, medical trauma, and grief. Born and bred in Chicago by two public school teachers, Ferrer has over 12 years of experience working in urban early childhood education, in palliative and hospice settings, in private practice, and as a child life specialist at several children’s hospitals in the Chicagoland area. In addition to her work with Momentos, Ferrer is Adjunct Faculty and a Doctoral Fellow at Erikson Institute, a graduate school in child development, and Loyola University Chicago’s School of Education. She co-authored “Transforming the Pediatric Experience” and has presented on several child development topics including “Virtualizing Therapeutic Interventions” at Mayo Clinic and “Communicating with Empathy and Compassion” at Make-A-Wish®. She is currently involved in research to strengthen professional standards of child life practices to serve marginalized pediatric populations. Most recently, Ferrer supervised a new child life practicum volunteer program at San Jorge Children and Women’s Hospital in Santurce, Puerto Rico, through an international child life organization called Child Life United. Ferrer also teaches several online distance learning courses and offers workshops in schools, hospitals, and professional conferences around the world. Kia currently resides in Chicago with her two sons, Diego (6) and Marco (4) and therapy dog, Lola (1).

    Rechelle Porter

    CFLC, LMSW, CCLS

    Director of Child Life Services
    New York Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital

    Rechelle D Porter, CCLS, LSW is the Director of Child Life Services and Creative Art Therapies at New York Presbyterian/ Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. She has been a Child Life Specialist for over 25 years in both inpatient pediatric general medicine and oncology units, Ambulatory Surgery and outpatient Hematology and Oncology. Hospital Liaison for Family Advisory Council,  and Internship Coordinator Rechelle has served ACLP Nominating committee, Education, and Training Committee.  She has presented on cultural competencies for child life specialist at regional conferences.  Facilitator for Zero Harm and Empathy training for New York Presbyterian. 


  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Read this Journal of Child Life article and earn 1.0 PDUs. This is a free resource for members and $15 for non-members. Once you've read the article, you will need to complete your quiz in order to access the certificate of completion through the professional development platform. Participants should maintain a copy of their certificate of attendance for their records. Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Hospitalization can be stressful for child patients and their parents, and stress during hospitalization is associated with longer recovery times and negative outcomes post-discharge. As a result, families need psychosocial support to cope with hospitalization. Child life specialists in children’s hospitals are trained to address this need, and there is empirical support for many of the techniques used by child life specialists. However, there is limited empirical support specific to child life services. In the current study, the authors examined differences in child anxiety and distress, parent stress, and parent-child relationship quality between families who received child life services and those who did not. Participants included 31 children between 3 and 15 years old who were admitted to a children’s hospital in the United States and their parents. Children completed a drawing task and responded to a visual scale, and parents completed a survey. Results indicated children who received child life services tended to exhibit lower anxiety, but there were no differences in parent outcomes based on receipt of child life services. Overall, the study provides promising preliminary evidence for the efficacy of child life services in improving children’s psychosocial experience of hospitalization. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    As healthcare becomes a growing global enterprise, families are increasingly seeking care internationally. This session aims to identify the impact of culture on providers’, parents’, and children’s coping during healthcare experiences.

    As healthcare becomes a growing global enterprise, families are increasingly seeking care internationally. This session aims to identify the impact of culture on providers’, parents’, and children’s coping during healthcare experiences.

    1. Outline common coping themes in varied cultures 

     2. Examine how culture and parenting intersect to influence children’s healthcare experiences 

     3. Identify how to help families navigate healthcare overseas 

     4. Analyze how a provider’s culture influences a patient’s healthcare experiences

    Suggested Domain: Ethics

    Deirdre A. Goltz, LCSW, CCLS

    Child Life Supervisor

    Child life specialist for 14 years, living and practicing abroad for 5 years, certified infant massage instructor, bachelor's in psychology, master's in clinical social work focusing on health, mental health and disability

    Katelyn Kieleszewski

    MEd, CCLS

    Child life specialist for 6 years, living and practicing abroad for 3 years, special education teacher and early intervention specialist; master’s in learning disabilities, bachelor’s in psychology

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This free member webinar will examine the five value drivers of child life services as articulated by the Association of Child Life Professionals’ 2020 statement, “The Value of Certified Child Life Specialists: Direct and Downstream Optimization of Pediatric Patient and Family Outcomes.”

    Value proposition statements are an increasingly common means of marketing the unique skills, traits, and outcomes associated with specific products and services –both in and beyond the healthcare industry. This free member webinar will examine the five value drivers of child life services as articulated by the Association of Child Life Professionals’ 2020 statement, “The Value of Certified Child Life Specialists: Direct and Downstream Optimization of Pediatric Patient and Family Outcomes.”Participants will delve into the often extensive, and other times still emerging, evidence base supporting the individual, familial, and institutional value of child life services and interventions. In addition, participants will encounter examples of the impacts of the value proposition statement on patient care and program development, while considering future opportunities for demonstrating our worth as a psychosocial healthcare profession.

    1.Attendees will understand the concepts behind, rationale for, and process of the Association of Child Life Professionals’ value proposition statement. 

    2.Attendees will examine the key findings of the value proposition statement, with attention to applications for clinical practice and program administration.

    3.Attendees will learn practical methods for using the value proposition statement to drive quality improvement for patients, families, and healthcare institutions.

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility


    Katherine Bennett

    MEd, CCLS

    Katherine Bennett, MEd, CCLS has worked as a Certified Child Life Specialist at Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital since 2001. She has worked with children and families in the areas of operative surgery, community outreach/education, PICC, inpatient medicine with all age groups, and in the burn center. Currently, she serves as the educator for Child Life & Volunteer Services, planning and coordinating the clinical training experiences for emerging child life professionals, onboarding new employees, working with the department's clinical advancement program and providing education about the needs of children in healthcare settings to colleagues both in and outside the Vanderbilt community. She has written and presented at international conferences and in several published outlets about such topics as medical play and its impact, developmental theory applied to hospitalized children, and teaching child life in the clinical and university settings.

    Ashlie Woodburn

    MEd, CCLS, CIMI

    Ashlie Woodburn, M.Ed., CCLS, CIMI is currently working as a child life specialist in the CVICU at Phoenix Children's and has been practicing as a CCLS for five years. Ashlie has experience implementing a wide range of child life interventions that meet the needs of diverse patients and families across outpatient clinic, inpatient acute and critical care settings. Ashlie is particularly interested in meeting the developmental needs of infants with chronic medical conditions and has worked to implement programs to increase the utilization of child life support during infant procedures and encourage developmentally appropriate sensory support in the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit. Ashlie is a contributing author for the child life value proposition statement and is passionate about evidence-based practice in child life. Her academic training includes Bachelor of Science degrees in Psychology and Family and Human Development from Arizona State University and a Master of Education degree in Child Studies from Vanderbilt University. 

    Katy Hoskins

    CCLS

    Katy Hoskins, CCLS is a Certified Child Life Specialist in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, TN. Her interests and advocacy centers around infant mental health, non-pharmacological pain management/procedural support for infants, prenatal psychosocial support for parents and siblings in Maternal Fetal medicine, preterm developmental needs, program development in Neonatology, and family-centered end of life care. Katy has been a child life specialist for almost five years with previous clinical experience in the emergency department and inpatient neurology at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, TN. She graduated in 2015 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Ecology with a concentration in Child Life and will begin pursuing her Masters degree in Early Childhood and Family Development at Missouri State University this fall. Katy serves on many hospital committees, including chair of the NICU Bereavement Committee, and is also an ACLP Bulletin committee member.

    Jessika Boles

    PhD, CCLS

    Vanderbilt University

    Jessika Boles, PhD, CCLS is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, and a Certified Child Life Specialist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Religious Studies from Rhodes College, a Master's degree in Applied Child Studies from Vanderbilt University, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Educational Psychology with a graduate certificate in Qualitative Research from the University of Memphis. She has been a practicing child life specialist for fourteen years, the first 8 of which were spent in pediatric and adolescent oncology at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, with the following years dedicated to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. Dr. Boles is known for her research on the concept of legacy as it is perceived by various stakeholders and translated into clinical practices with children and families. Additionally, as the leader of the CHILL (Children's Healthcare, Illness, Legacy, and Loss) lab at Vanderbilt University, her research brings together multidisciplinary collaborators and student researchers to study the psychosocial needs and experiences of children and families in multiple contexts: pediatric critical care, medical complexity, developmental disabilities, adverse childhood experiences, and grief and bereavement. She has held multiple posts in the Association of Child Life Professionals, and currently serves as Lead Fellow for the Association of Child Life Professionals and as a voting member of the Institutional Review Board at Vanderbilt University and Medical Center. In her spare time, she enjoys punk rock, her family's home and menagerie of pets in Montana, and spending time with her children and husband.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Read this Journal of Child Life article and earn 1.0 PDUs. This is a free resource for members and $15 for non-members. Once you've read the article, you will need to complete your quiz in order to access the certificate of completion through the professional development platform. Participants should maintain a copy of their certificate of attendance for their records. Suggested Domain: Intervention

    Previous research has demonstrated that medical play intervention is associated with decreased pain, fear, and anxiety in children undergoing surgical procedures; however, these studies have typically examined one-on-one, adult-directed, and preparation-focused uses of medical play. Therefore, the purpose of this mixed-methods pilot study was to examine the impact of a group medical play intervention on children’s self-reported fear and observed anxiety in the pre-operative waiting area, and determine the feasibility of group medical play as a research intervention while balancing clinical care. Twenty children (ages 5 to 10 years) scheduled for a sedated surgical or medical procedure in the pre-operative services waiting area of a children’s hospital in the Southeastern United States participated in a 30-minute group medical play session facilitated by a Certified Child Life Specialist. At the conclusion of the group activity, participants used a pictorial scale to rate their level of fear about surgery at two distinct time points: prior to and after the medical play session. In addition, they responded to three open-ended prompts about their perceptions of the activity. Participant fear ratings were analyzed using a two-tailed, paired-samples t-test, revealing that the group medical play activity was associated with a statistically significant decrease in participant fears about surgery. In conclusion, group medical play as a research intervention was both clinically feasible and effective in reducing children’s fears about surgery, highlighting the value of group play opportunities for children’s coping in health care settings.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Read this Journal of Child Life article and earn 1.0 PDUs. This is a free resource for members and $15 for nonmembers. Once you've read the article, you will need to complete your quiz to access the certificate of completion through the professional development platform. Participants should maintain a copy of their certificate of attendance for their records. Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    The ever-changing ethnic and cultural landscape of the United States drives the need to better understand diversity in its workforce. The purpose of this study was to conduct an equity audit in a midwestern children’s hospital’s psychosocial department to assess the perceived culture of the diversity climate. The goal of the equity audit was to uncover ways in which the department could identify needs and strengthen awareness towards the development of an inclusive environment. The equity audit was conducted in the form of a questionnaire addressing four main themes identified in workplace diversity research: physical environment, matching, communication, and leadership. Results showed that the culture of diversity appeared to be an optimistic one with many opportunities for growth and change. Overall, the questionnaire proved helpful in assessing the culture of diversity among professionals at the Midwestern Children’s hospital and identifying opportunities for awareness and inclusion.  

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Read this Journal of Child Life article and earn 1.0 PDUs. This is a free resource for members and $15 for non-members. Once you've read the article, you will need to complete your quiz in order to access the certificate of completion through the professional development platform. Participants should maintain a copy of their certificate of attendance for their records. Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    Pediatric patient populations are changing and healthcare environments are becoming increasingly more complex. Child life professionals must adapt to the realities of today’s healthcare spaces if they hope to make a difference in the lives of hospitalized children and their families. This paper explores some of the challenges associated with the current ways of thinking and theoretical orientations, which can impede professional growth and psychosocial care as a whole. For example, practice and scholarship continue to be guided by developmental theories, with little regard for how race and other social determinants may affect child health outcomes. As a way forward, child life professionals must consider engaging in a paradigmatic shift whereby new theories and approaches can address the realities of racial disparities and reject the antiquated views of childhood embedded within established developmental theories.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Read this Journal of Child Life article and earn 1.0 PDUs. This is a free resource for members and $15 for non-members. Once you've read the article, you will need to complete your quiz to access the certificate of completion through the professional development platform. Participants should maintain a copy of their certificate of attendance for their records. Suggested Domain: Intervention

    There is much variation in the way child life specialists implement and document their interventions and services, especially among practice arenas. This variation includes the methods child life specialists use to set individual goals with pediatric clients and families, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of their interventions and services. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how goal attainment scaling (GAS) could and should be integrated into the daily practices of child life specialists working in a pediatric rehabilitation setting. GAS is a widely used individualized outcome measure, designed to assess whether individuals have achieved the goals of intervention by quantifying their progress (Kiresuk & Sherman, 1968). As there is currently no literature on the integration or utility of GAS as an outcome measure for child life specialists, this paper will critically examine the available peer-reviewed literature to demonstrate how and why GAS is currently being implemented in pediatric rehabilitative settings by other health care practitioners. Recommendations for the transferability of GAS in child life practice will subsequently be discussed to not only address this gap in knowledge but to further emphasize the benefits of using an individualized outcome measure in clinical practice.