You Don’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Good: Assessing and Addressing Perfectionism and Impostorism in the Child Life Field - (2024)

Includes a Live Web Event on 03/05/2024 at 1:00 PM (EST)

The field of child life is highly competitive and demands a range of adaptable skills to support diverse clients. In this article, the authors will present research highlighting the prevalence of perfectionism and impostorism among child life students and specialists, and how these factors can impact clinical training, professional practice, and personal well-being. The authors will also discuss recommendations and implications to address these concerns for individuals, child life teams, and the child life field as a whole.

Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

1.5 PDU

Learning Objective(s):

- Describe the prevalence and impact of perfectionism and imposterism among child life students and professionals.

- Discuss the implications of perfectionism and imposterism in promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion in the child life field.

- Identify strategies to overcome negative patterns related to perfectionism and imposterism to better support students, promote individual well-being, and improve team dynamics.

- Reflect on your own experiences related to perfectionism and imposterism and their role in well-being.

- Engage in conversation with colleagues about strategies to promote their own and each other’s well-being and foster a supportive child life team culture.

Please note: All webinar contents and its certificate will expire on 3/5/2027 regardless of when it is purchased, accessed, or completed. At that point, contents will no longer be available in any form, including as an archive or as a PDU certificate. It is the responsibility of the learner to complete the contents and download and save the certificate for their records prior to 3/5/2027.

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Thank you to our generous webinar sponsor, University of Wisconsin-Madison Continuing Studies

Katy Tenhulzen, MS, CCLS

Senior Lecturer; Program Coordinator; Child Life Specialist

Central Washington University

Katy Tenhulzen has served in the field of child life for over 20 years. She is the Child Life program coordinator and a senior lecturer in the Child Development and Family Science program at Central Washington University, and works as a child life specialist at Swedish Hospital in Seattle. Katy conducts research related to child life training and practice and parent and sibling grief.

Amy Claridge, PhD

Professor; Program Coordinator

Central Washington University

Amy Claridge is a Professor in the Child Development and Family Science program at Central Washington University. She is also a licensed marriage and family therapist in the state of Washington and serves as the director of the Central Washington University Family Resource Center. Dr. Claridge conducts mixed-method research related to family stress and resilience, as well as research about student and professional wellbeing and burnout.

Kendall Baker, CCLS, MS

Child Life Specialist

Mary Bridge Children's Hospital

Kendall Baker is a Certified Child Life Specialist at Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital in Tacoma, Washington. Kendall provides psychosocial support for patients and families in a variety of outpatient specialty clinics. In addition to her clinical work, Kendall is passionate about conducting research to support the growth and development of the child life profession.

Kelsey Carlson, MS

Child Life Student

Central Washington University

Kelsey Carlson is an instructor in the Child Development and Family Science program at Central Washington University. She is a certified elementary school teacher and has supported children and their families in a variety of settings from preschool to emerging adulthood. Kelsey is in the process of becoming a Certified Child Life Specialist. As an educator and family advocate, she is passionate about supporting children and families through culturally responsive care.

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You Don’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Good: Assessing and Addressing Perfectionism and Imposterism in the Child Life Field - (2024)
03/05/2024 at 1:00 PM (EST)  |  90 minutes
03/05/2024 at 1:00 PM (EST)  |  90 minutes The field of child life is highly competitive and demands a range of adaptable skills to support diverse clients. In this article, the authors will present research highlighting the prevalence of perfectionism and imposterism among child life students and specialists, and how these factors can impact clinical training, professional practice, and personal well-being. The authors will also discuss recommendations and implications to address these concerns for individuals, child life teams, and the child life field as a whole.
Survey
6 Questions
Quiz
2 Questions  |  3 attempts  |  4/2 points to pass
2 Questions  |  3 attempts  |  4/2 points to pass
Certificate
1.50 PDU credits  |  Certificate available
1.50 PDU credits  |  Certificate available