2023 Professional Development Subscription

This package provides live and on-demand access to all of our 2023 programming. Participants of this package will gain access to webinars across all exam domains and have the potential to earn 23.5 PDUs. 

Not able to attend the live event or subscribing mid-year? No problem. All participants will retain access to on-demand 2023 webinars for one year from the date of purchase. With this premium subscription, ACLP's newest webinars are always at your fingertips.

*Please note that Introduction to Foundations of Racially Conscious Collaboration is NOT included in this package

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 07/21/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Developing autonomy and social identity within peer groups is a hallmark trait of adolescence. Inpatient hospitalization, evolving technology, and the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted how chronically ill adolescents interact with their peers. This presentation will discuss how group programming in the hospital setting can assist in mitigating these barriers to optimal development and provide participants with concrete tools to successfully establishing group programming in their institution. Suggested Domain: Intervention 1.5 PDUs

    Developing autonomy and social identity within peer groups is a hallmark trait of adolescence. Inpatient hospitalization, evolving technology, and the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted how chronically ill adolescents interact with their peers. This presentation will discuss how group programming in the hospital setting can assist in mitigating these barriers to optimal development and provide participants with concrete tools to successfully establishing group programming in their institution.

    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will have exposure to background in theory and current research regarding adolescent development, and how hospitalization, chronic illness, and current cultural trends are creating barriers to optimal development. 

    2. Participants will have an understanding of different peer group modalities to establish safe and therapeutic, peer group environment with directed goals and objectives that meet the needs of varying ages, cultural backgrounds, interests, and developmental levels.

    3. Participants will understand strategies to successful group programming including physical settings, adaptability of facilitator, strategies for management of multiple patients, reflection and processing of activity, and continued follow up.

    Katie Sullivan Bradford

    MS, CCLS

    Katie is a child life specialist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital where she has worked with adolescents in acute care, the mental health population as well as chronic pain rehabilitation for over six years. She has been a certified child life specialist since 2011, and received her Masters in Child Development and Family Relations in 2010.  

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/23/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    A child life focused elective was created to increase inter-professional collaboration and enhance knowledge of child development for medical students. This elective encourages a more global awareness of how to treat the whole child, while also optimizing the utilization of resources within the healthcare setting. This webinar will provide insight into how one institution identified a need, and the steps taken to implement a successful 2-week immersive elective for 4th year medical students. Participants will learn about curriculum development, implementation, evaluation, and continued sustainment. Throughout this discussion, insight into the value this elective brings to all involved will be shared. Join us and leave feeling empowered to partner with your colleagues to create your own program. Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility 1.0 PDU

    A child life focused elective was created to increase inter-professional collaboration and enhance knowledge of child development for medical students.  This elective encourages a more global awareness of how to treat the whole child, while also optimizing the utilization of resources within the healthcare setting.  This webinar will provide insight into how one institution identified a need, and the steps taken to implement a successful 2-week immersive elective for 4th year medical students.  Participants will learn about curriculum development, implementation, evaluation, and continued sustainment. Throughout this discussion, insight into the value this elective brings to all involved will be shared.  Join us and leave feeling empowered to partner with your colleagues to create your own program.

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Discuss the design and completion of a needs assessment aimed at guiding development of a Child Life Elective.

    2. Identify key collaborators for successful development of a Child Life Elective.

    3. Describe steps used for curriculum development.

    4. Explain methods to evaluate success and maintain active enrollment in an elective of this nature. 

    Lisa Wolff

    MS, CCLS

    Lisa Wolff has been a child life specialist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital for five years. She received her master's degree in Child Life and Family-Centered Care from Wheelock College in Boston, MA. Lisa partnered with Amy Carter and Chris Mattson in 2019 to create a child life-focused elective for medical students and recently collaborated on a community engagement elective for residents. Lisa's primary clinical focus is the support of hematology and oncology patients and their families. She also has a passion for educating healthcare team members on the role of child life to increase interdisciplinary collaboration and improve the care of patients and families.

    Amy Carter

    MS, CCLS

    Amy Carter is a lead child life specialist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital.  She joined the team 24 years ago after receiving her master’s degree in Child life and Family Centered Care from Wheelock College in Boston MA.  Over the course of her career, Amy has worked as a child life specialist providing psychosocial support to enhance patient and family coping in both inpatient and outpatient settings.  She currently holds a lead position where, in addition to supporting clinical needs on the team, she coordinates student programming, assistants, and donations.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/23/2023 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Certified Child Life Specialists, Occupational Therapists, and Registered Nurses, each possess expertise and individual scopes of practice in the education and encouragement of bowel and bladder self-management. Using a collaborative approach, this webinar will outline specific practice guidelines, demonstrate the importance, and explore the challenges of bowel and bladder self-management. Additionally, it will utilize case studies referencing inpatient admissions in an urban pediatric rehabilitation hospital to illustrate these objectives. Suggested Domain: Intervention 1.0 PDU

    Certified Child Life Specialists, Occupational Therapists, and Registered Nurses, each possess expertise and individual scopes of practice in the education and encouragement of bowel and bladder self-management.  Using a collaborative approach, this webinar will outline specific practice guidelines, demonstrate the importance, and explore the challenges of bowel and bladder self-management. Additionally, it will utilize case studies referencing inpatient admissions in an urban pediatric rehabilitation hospital to illustrate these objectives.

    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to identify at least 3 interventions

    2. Understand the psychosocial benefit of self management of bowel and bladder

    3. Describe strategies for collaborating with medical and rehabilitative team members

    Jackie Newman

    MS, CCLS

    Jackie Newman, MS, CCLS currently serves as Child Life Specialist I at Kennedy Krieger’s inpatient rehab unit, where she has worked for two years. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and Human Development and a Master’s Degree in Child Life both from Wheelock College at Boston University.  Jackie has a professional interest in promoting self-advocacy and independence for children and adolescents with spinal cord injuries.

    Emily Montag

    MS, CCLS

    Emily Montag currently works as a Certified Child Life Specialist at Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit in Baltimore, Maryland. Emily received her Master’s Degree at Towson University in Child Life, Administration, and Family Collaboration. Emily enjoys working at Kennedy Krieger Institute particularly because of the psychosocial collaborative approach within the multidisciplinary team. Emily previously presented at last year’s Rehabilitation Psychology Conference on “Psychosocial Support for Children and Families Affected by Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) in a Pediatric Rehabilitation Setting.” Emily’s special interests include providing support for children with spinal cord injuries who are weaning off ventilation support, promoting independence with self-catheterization, and educating siblings of children who have sustained traumatic brain injuries.

    Katie Cooper

    OTR/L

    Katie Cooper is an occupational therapist at Kennedy Krieger’s International Center for Spinal Cord Injury. I received my master’s at Towson University in 2021. I help children with traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCI) in our inpatient hospital improve independence with daily activities by incorporating concepts of activity based restorative therapy. Independence with bowel and bladder function directly impacts performance in school, play, and the quality of life for our patient’s. It is a great interest of mine to optimize children with SCI’s independence with self-catheterization so they can return to school and engage in desired activities. During my career, I have developed lectures on neurogenic bowel and bladders for the occupational therapy department and fabricated novel orthoses to assist with improving independence with toileting.

    Erin Dignan

    BSN, RN, CPN

    Erin Dignan is a Clinical Registered Nurse II at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Erin received her Bachelor’s School of Nursing from York College in Pennsylvania. Erin’s special interests include working with neonates, children who have sustained traumatic brain injuries, and complex pediatric patients. In September 2022, Erin received the Daisey Award in for her outstanding work with a long-term patient and their family.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 11/15/2023 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    CCLS are often faced with ethical dilemmas in their daily practice. These dilemmas may arise from many different layers including the patients, families, health care team, and/or culture and society. Most who serve in health care subscribe to the Best Interest Standard, which is the "ethical requirement that people who care for others will do so in good faith, placing their assessment of that person's best interests above their own". As CCLS, navigation of Parental Authority, Pediatric Assent, Justice, and Respect for Person are common ethical principles that often arise with each intervention. However, veracity, or the obligation to be truthful may vary depending on culture. Often Eastern and Western Medicine and Culture have differing views on including children and adolescents in their health care decisions. As CCLS, who are often trained in Western Medicine, we must balance obligations to respect individual patient autonomy, professional truth telling, and tolerances of multicultural beliefs and values. This presentation will review ethical principles such as Beneficence, Nonmaleficence, Fidelity, and Cultural Relativism and how they relate to navigating ethical dilemmas, in particular with different cultural views or beliefs. For example, a CCLS may feel obligated to be honest if a patient asks, "What is happening to them?" or a CCLS may feel an obligation in Respect for a patient's autonomy to be included in decision making, memory making, or legacy building activities related to their medical diagnosis or prognosis. This presentation will provide participants an opportunity to utilize an Ethical Framework to navigate these ethical dilemmas and explore is Veracity, Always Best when working with different cultures. Suggested Domain: Ethics 1.0 PDU

    CCLS are often faced with ethical dilemmas in their daily practice.  These dilemmas may arise from many different layers including the patients, families, health care team, and/or culture and society.  Most who serve in health care subscribe to the Best Interest Standard, which is the "ethical requirement that people who care for others will do so in good faith, placing their assessment of that person's best interests above their own".  As CCLS, navigation of Parental Authority, Pediatric Assent, Justice, and Respect for Person are common ethical principles that often arise with each intervention.  However, veracity, or the obligation to be truthful may vary depending on culture.  Often Eastern and Western Medicine and Culture have differing views on including children and adolescents in their health care decisions. As CCLS, who are often trained in Western Medicine, we must balance obligations to respect individual patient autonomy, professional truth telling, and tolerances of multicultural beliefs and values.  This presentation will review ethical principles such as Beneficence, Nonmaleficence, Fidelity, and Cultural Relativism and how they relate to navigating ethical dilemmas, in particular with different cultural views or beliefs.  For example, a CCLS may feel obligated to be honest if a patient asks, "What is happening to them?" or a CCLS may feel an obligation in Respect for a patient's autonomy to be included in decision making, memory making, or legacy building activities related to their medical diagnosis or prognosis.  This presentation will provide participants an opportunity to utilize an Ethical Framework to navigate these ethical dilemmas and explore is Veracity, Always Best when working with different cultures.

    Suggested Domain: Ethics

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Utilize ethical tenets to assess and implement patient interventions 

    2. Review application of child life code of ethics, with emphasis on cultural implications 

    Leslie Daniels

    BA, CCLS

    Leslie Daniels, CCLS, is a Child Life Manager at Children’s Mercy Hospital (CMH) in Kansas City, Missouri. Leslie received her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Missouri-Columbia. For over twenty years, Leslie has worked in direct patient care, primarily serving in critical care areas and the emergency department, and she served as child life internship coordinator. Leslie has played an active role on the CMH Aftercare Committee, providing support to children and adolescents who have experienced the death of a sibling. Leslie holds a certificate in Pediatric Bioethics. Leslie has been active with ACLP, specifically the CLCC, most recently serving as Chair of the Certification Commission. Away from the hospital, Leslie enjoys spending time with her husband, Billy, and her children, Alex, Cheyanne, and John. She also enjoys visiting with family and friends and traveling.

    Lucy Raab

    MA, CCLS, Certificate in Pediatric Bioethics

    Lucy is the Assistant Director of the Child Life Department at Children’s Mercy Hospital Kansas City. Lucy has served on the ACLP Board of Directors as the Child Life Certifying Commission Chair and has been chair of the Ethics Committee for ACLP. Lucy has been a certified child life specialist at CM for 25 years, working clinically with a variety of patient populations and diagnoses. She is focused on facilitating psychosocial interventions that build and fortify resilience in patients and families facing healthcare challenges. Lucy is committed to prioritizing the coping, developmental, and emotional safety needs of patients and their families. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/07/2023 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Behaviour is communication and above all else, behaviour gives us insight into how a child is coping with stress and stressors. Stress is defined as anything that requires a large amount of energy to get us back to our baseline. With this definition we are asked to focus on the amount of energy it takes to deal with a stressor. Stress occurs within 6 different domains - biological, emotion, cognitive, social, pro-social and environmental. Children's brains are developing throughout childhood and adolescence, and these experiences can be a strong influence on how their brains become wired. Our work with children has to be focused on decreasing the stress the child is experiencing and providing them with experiences of safety, rest and recovery through our relationship. In this interactive presentation, participants will be challenged to view all behaviour through the lens of threat and safety. Discussion and teaching will focus on the neurobiological experiences of stress for children. This includes how the brain responds to a stressor, the stress response, and how the body experiences stress using the 6 domains of stress. Safety is a brain response that quiets the stress alarm and provides opportunities for rest and recovery. Experiences of safety are a major role of the Child Life Specialist. This presentation will discuss how to include this understanding in practice through the development of a relationship between the CLS and the child and family. Suggested Domain: Assessment 1.5 PDUs

    Behaviour is communication and above all else, behaviour gives us insight into how a child is coping with stress and stressors.  Stress is defined as anything that requires a large amount of energy to get us back to our baseline.  With this definition we are asked to focus on the amount of energy it takes to deal with a stressor.  Stress occurs within 6 different domains - biological, emotion, cognitive, social, pro-social and environmental.  Children's brains are developing throughout childhood and adolescence, and these experiences can be a strong influence on how their brains become wired.  Our work with children has to be focused on decreasing the stress the child is experiencing and providing them with experiences of safety, rest and recovery through our relationship.  In this interactive presentation, participants will be challenged to view all behaviour through the lens of threat and safety.  Discussion and teaching will focus on the neurobiological experiences of stress for children.  This includes how the brain responds to a stressor, the stress response, and how the body experiences stress using the 6 domains of stress.  Safety is a brain response that quiets the stress alarm and provides opportunities for rest and recovery.  Experiences of safety are a major role of the Child Life Specialist.  This presentation will discuss how to include this understanding in practice through the development of a relationship between the CLS and the child and family.

    Suggested Domain: Assessment

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To provide a neurobiological understanding of how stress is experienced within childhood.  

    2. To provide an understanding of how trauma and traumatic events affects brain development and coping.

    3. To provide an understanding of how to support children with extreme stress in practice through relationship that supports a sense of safety for the child.

    Cindy Pilchuk

    B.A., BScN, MSc, EdD (c), CCLS, RN

    CIndy has 23 years experience working with children and families in a therapeutic role to assist with coping, growth and development, and supporting mental well-being.  Cindy is a Certified Child Life Specialist and a Registered Nurse.  Cindy holds a Master's of Science in Child Life and Pediatric Psychosocial Care from McMaster University and is currently working towards a Doctorate degree from University of Toronto in Child Study and Education.  Cindy is a Public Health Nurse at Toronto Public Health within the child health and development division.  Cindy also has a private practice acting as a consultant and parenting educator. And above all of this, Cindy is the mother to three wonderful and perfectly, imperfect children who inspire her on a daily basis to be the best person she can be.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 09/20/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This webinar will focus on providing racially conscious pediatric psychosocial care to the patients and families we serve. Areas that will be discussed include reflecting on the theoretical frameworks we use, understanding the importance of diversifying the field of child life, considering the influence of racism on health outcomes, and recommendations for our everyday practice in order to deliver high quality care for our diverse patients and families. Suggested Domain: DEI (domain of your choosing) 1.0 PDU

    This webinar will focus on providing racially conscious pediatric psychosocial care to the patients and families we serve. Areas that will be discussed include reflecting on the theoretical frameworks we use, understanding the importance of diversifying the field of child life, considering the influence of racism on health outcomes, and recommendations for our everyday practice in order to deliver high quality care for our diverse patients and families.

    Suggested Domain: DEI (domain of your choosing)

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To reflect on whether our practice is inclusive of patients and families from minority backgrounds

    2. Enforce the importance of practicing cultural humility

    3. Feel empowered to create a safe and inclusive environment for our diverse patients and families

    Maria Sohail

    CCLS, MSc, BASc

    Maria Sohail is a Certified Child Life Specialist working at McMaster Children's Hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, within the technology programming and inpatient support role. Maria holds a masters degree in Child Life and Pediatric Psychosocial Care and Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Behaviour and Autism Behavioural Sciences. As a visible person of colour, Maria is passionate about advocating for and ensuring that patients and families from marginalized and vulnerable populations receive the individualized care they need to feel and be successful

    Sherry Cheng

    CCLS, MSc, HBSc

    Sherry Cheng is a Certified Child Life Specialist currently working at the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Ontario within the Virtual Reality Program and float support role. Sherry completed her MSc in Child Life & Pediatric Psychosocial Care through McMaster University, where she gained valuable knowledge and experience that aligned with her interests in the therapeutic value of play, child development, and the process of developing resiliency. As an immigrant and person of colour herself, Sherry’s philosophy is to forever remain a learner, where she invites her patients and families to share with her unique knowledge about themselves. Sherry recognizes the different interactions and impacts that one’s culture can have on one’s identity and how that affects the care they wish to receive. Her goal is to seek out and include these pieces of information in her practice each and every time she creates an individualized care plan for her patients.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/06/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This presentation will explore how student programming was expanded to incorporate facility dog work in a new model for a practicum experience. An in-depth look at this institution's student programming model will be shared. The student’s unique perspective will be shared through a first-person student experience and direct connection to growth into internship readiness. This first-person experience will also be shared by facility dog handler and clinical trainer to reflect upon how the practicum student partnership offered an opportunity to explore clinical engagement. This presentation will also showcase future plans for program expansion and implementation in other institutions Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility 1.5 PDUs

    This presentation will explore how student programming was expanded to incorporate facility dog work in a new model for a practicum experience. An in-depth look at this institution's student programming model will be shared. The student’s unique perspective will be shared through a first-person student experience and direct connection to growth into internship readiness. This first-person experience will also be shared by facility dog handler and clinical trainer to reflect upon how the practicum student partnership offered an opportunity to explore clinical engagement. This presentation will also showcase future plans for program expansion and implementation in other institutions

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Define Facility Dog Program and Practicum Programing through the lens of ACLP and the Service Dog Organization.

    2. Learn about the benefits and structure of a Facility Dog Program and Child Life Student Program partnership.

    3. Discuss future and creative goals on how to implement programming into other hospital/teaching environments.

    Courtney Dill

    MS, CCLS, LMT

    Courtney Dill, MS, CCLS, LMT is a child life specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She is currently working the capacity of training coordinator, where she guides practicum, intern and cooperative students in the Department of Child Life, Education and Creative Arts. Courtney's interest include promoting well being and alternative healthcare.

    Elizabeth Olsen

    MS, CCLS

    Elizabeth Olsen has been a Certified Child Life Specialist for over fifteen years. Her previous experiences in healthcare include working in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NY Presbyterian and Good Shepherd Hospice in Long Island. She has been working at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) for the past five years and began her career there in the Special Delivery Unit. Elizabeth has been working with SSD Dilly, CHOP’s first Facility Dog, hospital wide for the past two and a half years. Elizabeth and Dilly help to support patient’s during procedures, co-treat sessions with various therapies, and with the Hospital School Program. Elizabeth has focused much of her career to supporting grieving children and families. She helped to develop the curriculum for the Hospice and Palliative Care of New York State Interdisciplinary Pediatric Palliative Care. In her new role, Elizabeth is currently working on a certification in Service and Therapy Dog Training Professional. She has presented at several national and local conferences on grief and loss, Animal Assisted Therapy interventions, and Perinatal Hospice.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/02/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Supporting patients and families in the hospital can be emotionally depleting. Many employees in caregiving professions are exposed to unavoidable adverse and distressing events. In order to maintain creativity, resilience, and passion for this work, it is important to find sustainable ways to acknowledge and manage symptoms of trauma, compassion fatigue, and burnout. This webinar will review the signs of trauma, compassion fatigue, and burnout; describe ways that self-care rituals can increase resiliency and discuss concrete practices that can be incorporated into departmental policies and routines. In this webinar, we will discuss how the implementation of Wellness Champions in the Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department can promote holistic wellbeing among clinicians in practical and sustainable ways Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility 1.0 PDU

    Supporting patients and families in the hospital can be emotionally depleting. Many employees in caregiving professions are exposed to unavoidable adverse and distressing events. In order to maintain creativity, resilience, and passion for this work, it is important to find sustainable ways to acknowledge and manage symptoms of trauma, compassion fatigue, and burnout.
    This webinar will review the signs of trauma, compassion fatigue, and burnout; describe ways that self-care rituals can increase resiliency and discuss concrete practices that can be incorporated into departmental policies and routines. In this webinar, we will discuss how the implementation of Wellness Champions in the Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department can promote holistic wellbeing among clinicians in practical and sustainable ways

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to identify three signs of burnout, compassion fatigue, or vicarious trauma.

    2. Participants will be able to identify at least three ways self-care practices can benefit daily routines and increase resiliency. 

    3. Participants will be able to identify three sustainable self-care practices that can be incorporated into a department’s day-to-day operations.

    Katherine Parker

    MA, LCAT, ATR-BC

    Katherine Parker holds a Masters of Art degree in Art Therapy and Counseling. Katherine is a licensed Creative Arts Therapist at Mount Sinai Health Care System. Katherine has ten years of experience in trauma-informed care in both community and healthcare settings. Katherine utilizes art therapy to support wellness interventions for children and teens of adult patients in the hospital. These interventions also extend to staff in the Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Jaclyn Craig

    MPS, LCAT, ATR-BC

    Jaclyn Craig is a Licensed and Board Certified art therapist and has been a full time clinician at Mount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital for over seven years. During this time Jaclyn has provided equitable art therapy services and full time facility dog interventions throughout the hospital system. Jaclyn utilizes her clinical skill set in art therapy and animal assisted therapy to support and promote well-being and resilience amongst patients and healthcare professionals alike.

    Michelle Badejo

    BN, CCLS

    Michelle Badejo is a Certified Child Life Specialist at Mount Sinai Hospital with a background in pediatric nursing. Michelle has experience in pediatric medicine, hospice, and ICU environments. Michelle works with pediatric patients and families to provide interventions supporting wellness in the hospital setting.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/28/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    The importance and significance of hospital to home transitions following hospitalization for children with medically complex needs have been the focus of considerable research and healthcare policy (Leyenaar, J.K., Rizzo, P.A., Khodyakov, D., Leslie, L.K., Lindenauer, P.K., & Mangione-Smith, R., 2018). An additional component contributing to the complexities of this patient population is the percentage of children with medically complex needs following non accidental trauma. Utilizing case examples, webinar participants will explore the definition of medical complexity following non accidental trauma and will discuss the evidence based interventions available to best support this patient population. Suggested Domain: Intervention 1.5 PDUs

    The importance and significance of hospital to home transitions following hospitalization for children with medically complex needs have been the focus of considerable research and healthcare policy (Leyenaar, J.K., Rizzo, P.A., Khodyakov, D., Leslie, L.K., Lindenauer, P.K., & Mangione-Smith, R., 2018). An additional component contributing to the complexities of this patient population is the percentage of children with medically complex needs following non accidental trauma. Utilizing case examples, webinar participants will explore the definition of medical complexity following non accidental trauma and will discuss the evidence based interventions available to best support this patient population.

    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to define medical complexity in the pediatric patient.

    2. Demonstrate the ability to define non accidental trauma in pediatrics.

    3. Exhibit the ability to identify and describe evidence based interventions that can be utilized to support the child with medical complexity following non accidental trauma.

    Jennifer Fieten

    MA, CCLS

    Jennifer Fieten has been a child life specialist for over twenty years, providing child life services in various hospital settings, in pediatric palliative care and hospice, and child life instruction for students in the academic setting. She has her bachelor's degree in family, consumer, nutrition, and sciences from Northern Illinois University; her master's degree in education from University of Texas in San Antonio, and has started her doctoral study in child development from the Erikson Institute in Chicago. In a previous role, she proposed, developed, coordinated and facilitated a hospital wide child abuse response team, which led to her appointment to two state wide child death review teams. She has recently served as the child life specialist in a pediatric specific transitional medical care facility, caring for children with medical complexity following non accidental trauma and is currently the child life specialist at Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, an innovative rehabilitation hospital, continuing to serve children with medical complexity, and their families.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 07/11/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    An exploration of diversity, equity, and inclusion through an anti-racist lens and how it is threaded throughout the courses int he Child Life academic program. The presentation will include deepening DEI threads consistently throughout the program, culminating in the internship and thesis. Through curriculum mapping, examination of course syllabi, the author will examine how DEI applied both implicitly and explicitly throughout the program. 1.5 PDUs Suggested Domain: DEI (domain of your choosing)

    An exploration of diversity, equity, and inclusion through an anti-racist lens and how it is threaded throughout the courses int he Child Life academic program. The presentation will include deepening DEI threads consistently throughout the program, culminating in the internship and thesis. Through curriculum mapping, examination of course syllabi, the author will examine how DEI applied both implicitly and explicitly throughout the program.

    1.5 PDUs

    Suggested Domain: DEI (domain of your choosing)

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Explore the concept of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion as it pertains to child life clinical practice.

    2. Participants will be introduced to the concept of Diversity, equity, and Inclusion as it pertains to racial consciousness in a child life academic program.

    3. Explore how racial consciousness through an anti-racist lens is threaded throughout the courses and coursework in a Child Life Program, culminating in supervised fieldwork (clinical internship) and the masters' thesis.

    Troy Pinkney-Ragsdale

    MA, CCLS

    Troy is a Certified Child Life Specialist for and has over 25 years of experience in the field of Child Life, including directing several child life programs in the tri-state area. She has served as the Director of the Child Life Masters Program at Bank Street College since 2004, and has taught the following courses: Child Development, Adolescent and Emerging Adulthood, Child Life in Health Care Settings, Children with Special Health Care Needs, and Child Life Administration.

    Troy has been an active member of the Association of Child Life Professionals and has held several leadership positions. Patient and Family Centered Care has been an integral part of her work with children, youth and their families for the last 30 years. She is committed to working with families. During her career, she has worked as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Therapist, Special Educator and as a Certified Child Life Specialist. Throughout her career she remains committed to and advocating for the diverse and unique needs of all patients and their family, supporting their growth and development.