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  • Efficient Inquiry: Painless Research Methods for Busy Clinicians

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 12/11/2019 at 2:30 PM (EST)

    The Association of Child Life Professionals’ Strategic Framework identifies research as a vital aspect to strengthening the perceived value and awareness of child life. More child life specialists are being inspired to conduct their own research to contribute to the field’s growing evidence base. In this session, through demonstration and case examples, attendees will learn research methods that are clinically feasible to implement and relevant to child life practice. Participants will be provided with easy-to-follow resources that break down the process of conducting a clinical research study from start to finish.

    The Association of Child Life Professionals’ Strategic Framework identifies research as a vital aspect to strengthening the perceived value and awareness of child life. More child life specialists are being inspired to conduct their own research to contribute to the field’s growing evidence base. In this session, through demonstration and case examples, attendees will learn research methods that are clinically feasible to implement and relevant to child life practice. Participants will be provided with easy-to-follow resources that break down the process of conducting a clinical research study from start to finish.


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Attendees will be able to recite the main approaches for conducting clinical research.

    2.) Attendees will be able to identify a research approach that is most suitable for use in their own setting. 

    3.) Attendees will be able to access resources that assist in implementing clinical research into their practice.

    Kathryn Cantrell

    PhD, CCLS

    Kathryn Cantrell, PhD, CCLS, is a child psychologist and child life specialist on faculty at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts Boston. Kathryn volunteers for the Association of Child Life Professionals and is the executive editor of the ACLP Bulletin and Child Life Focus. Her social justice research explores narrative interventions for youth who experience both societal oppression and chronic illness. She has published her research in multiple peer-reviewed journals and has presented at many international conferences.

  • Supporting Patients, Families and Staff at End of Life: A Framework for Success

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 12/09/2019 at 2:30 PM (EST)

    Evidence-based research suggests the importance of appropriate interventions to support patients, families and staff through these unique and challenging situations. This presentation describes the development and implementation of a bereavement committee within a medium sized child life department at a free-standing children’s hospital. Participants will be educated and empowered to enhance and advocate for bereavement services and support to staff.

    Evidence-based research suggests the importance of appropriate interventions to support patients, families and staff through these unique and challenging situations. This presentation describes the development and implementation of a bereavement committee within a medium sized child life department at a free-standing children’s hospital. Participants will be educated and empowered to enhance and advocate for bereavement services and support to staff.

    Learning Objectives:

    -Participants will be able to state rationale for varied psychosocial interventions for pediatric patients and their families at end of life through evidence-based research.
    -Participants will be able to learn strategies for advocating for varied psychosocial interventions for pediatric patients and their families at end of life in a hospital setting.

    -Participants will be able to describe various bereavement interventions used with patients and families at this institution. 

    -Participants will be able to identify and implement opportunities for staff education surrounding bereavement programming to increase comfort level in providing these interventions.

    -Participants will be able to identify and implement opportunities for staff support following bereavement interventions.

    Jana Teagle

    CTRS, CCLS, CBIS

    Jana Teagle has been a certified child life specialist for 13 years working primarily in both a PICU and rehab setting. She has been a part of the development and ongoing work of a bereavement committee in the child life department since 2014. She has planned and implemented therapeutic activities at a sibling bereavement camp.

    Jennifer Kelley

    CCLS

    Jennifer Kelley has been a certified child life specialist for 8 years and has spent the last four years working with oncology patients. She has been a part of the development and ongoing work of a bereavement committee in the child life department since 2014. She has planned and implemented therapeutic activities at a sibling bereavement camp.

  • Process improvements: applying “Elf” teamwork to manage holiday donations

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 11/04/2019 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    This presentation will discuss the creation of a process to accept holiday donations and process improvement efforts to optimize that process.

    This presentation will discuss the creation of a process to accept holiday donations and process improvement efforts to optimize that process. 

    Learning Objectives:

    -Identify concepts in Process Improvment: understand how they were employed to create an effective holiday donations reviewing system 

    -Explore ways to partner with varied disciplines to execute a complex interdisciplinary project to meet multiple outcomes

    Michael Campbell and Samantha Klaff

    Michael's background is in hospital administration, clinical social work and evidence based approaches to caring for children and their families. 

    Samantha has an extensive history in the field of child life as a clinician and lead and was instrumental in partnering to craft the elf workshop.

  • HIV and Youth: Ethical Concerns Regarding Disclosure

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 10/16/2019 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    Although medical advancements in HIV care are paramount, stigma and discrimination remain overarching barriers to those affected. These barriers play a significant role in deciding the appropriate time to disclose a positive HIV status to a perinatally infected child. This presentation will include a case study discussion in order to unpack the numerous ethical concerns faced in multi-disciplinary HIV care, especially regarding youth disclosure.

    Although medical advancements in HIV care are paramount, stigma and discrimination remain overarching barriers to those affected. These barriers play a significant role in deciding the appropriate time to disclose a positive HIV status to a perinatally infected child. This presentation will include a case study discussion in order to unpack the numerous ethical concerns faced in multi-disciplinary HIV care, especially regarding youth disclosure.

    Learning Objectives:

    • 1. Participants will gain an understanding of human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) and how youth of today are affected.
    • 2. Participants will have an understanding of the stigma related to HIV and the numerous adversities faced by those who are HIV positive. 
    • 3. Participants will engage in discussion related to the ethical concerns of HIV disclosure with youth.

    Lauren McCann

    Lauren McCann began her career as a Certified Child Life Specialist in 2004 at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, TN. After serving in the Emergency Department and Radiology Department, Lauren assumed the role of Manager of Child Life Services in 2009. Along with her management role, Lauren also provided child life services to the Le Bonheur Fetal Center. In 2015, Lauren moved out of Le Bonheur’s hospital setting and into community outreach services as Director of Community Programs. With a focus on teen pregnancy prevention and HIV/AIDS prevention/care, Lauren’s current role allows her to combine her love of child life, social work and the Memphis community.
    Certified Child Life Specialist (14 years)
    Licensed Masters Social Worker (10 years)
    Leadership in Child Life (6 years)
    Leadership in Community Outreach (3 years)

  • A Call for Culture Change and Re-prioritization of Our Most Vulnerable Patient: Establishing Neurodevelopmental Protection for the Neonate

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 10/14/2019 at 2:30 PM (EDT)

    At this institution prioritization is often given to patients who are three to seven years old. This has led to a disparity in providing appropriate care for the neonatal population. New research on the short and long term consequences of common procedures and interventions performed on hospitalized infants led this hospital to implement evidence-based guidelines utilizing multi-modal strategies for neonatal pain management and promotion of healthy neurodevelopment.

    At this institution prioritization is often given to patients who are three to seven years old. This has led to a disparity in providing appropriate care for the neonatal population. New research on the short and long term consequences of common procedures and interventions performed on hospitalized infants led this hospital to implement evidence-based guidelines utilizing multi-modal strategies for neonatal pain management and promotion of healthy neurodevelopment.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Integrate evidenced based practices to support the neurodevelopment of the hospitalized infant 2. Identify pharmacological and nonpharmacological ways to decrease pain in infants and articulate a strategic plan for rolling out new guidelines for treating stress and pain in infants
    3. Consider ethical implications and implement methods to protect infants from the morbidities associated with long-term hospitalization, trauma and stress.
    4. Assess and identify signs/symptoms of pain, stress, under-, and over-stimulation 5. Utilize methods for implementing culture change in terms of neurodevelopmental protection strategies

    Katrena Froh

    CCLS, CEIM, CPST

    Katrena Froh worked as a child life specialist in the NICU and participated in educational information sessions for NICU staff members. Since her time in the NICU Katrena has continued to present this information in other venues and throughout the hospital. Katrena is infant massage certified.

    Robert Froh

    RN, MSN, CPNP-AC

    Robert Froh is a critical care pediatric nurse practitioner working in the PICU at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital. Rob attended the pediatric pain master class at Minnesota Children’s Hospital and has since been working on implementing an institution wide quality improvement project regarding pain management.

  • Child Life and Qualitative Research: A Perfect Partnership

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 09/18/2019 at 2:30 PM (EDT)

    This webinar will present key concepts of qualitative research and why these concepts fit so well with the roles and responsibilities of child life professionals. We will examine pivotal qualitative research in child life scholarship, and look at ways this kind of research can add to this scholarship. Lastly, this webinar will provide examples of potential research partnerships between child life specialists, medical, and psychosocial staff.

    This webinar will present key concepts of qualitative research and why these concepts fit so well with the roles and responsibilities of child life professionals. We will examine pivotal qualitative research in child life scholarship, and look at ways this kind of research can add to this scholarship. Lastly, this webinar will provide examples of potential research partnerships between child life specialists, medical, and psychosocial staff.

    Learning Objectives: 

    After this webinar, participants will have:
    1. A definition of qualitative research.
    2. A review of qualitative research in child life scholarship.
    3. An understanding of the key concepts of qualitative research and the direct connections these concepts have to the roles and responsibilities of child life specialists. 4. Examples of qualitative research opportunities for child life staff to partner with medical and other psychosocial interdisciplinary teams. 5. Ideas for incorporating qualitative research training into academic programs.

    Jenny Chabot

    PhD, CCLS

    Jenny Chabot, PhD, CCLS, completed her child life clinical training with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and is the Coordinator of Child and Family Studies/Child Life at Ohio University. She teaches Fundamentals in Child Life and Pediatric Health Care, Children and Families in Health Care Settings, Qualitative Research, Foundations and Theories in Child Life, and Child Life in South Africa, a summer education abroad program in Cape Town. Dr. Chabot studies ambiguous loss in the hospitalization experience for patients and families and explores the role emotion work plays in child life work. She is a three-time recipient of the University Professor Award, a two-time recipient of the Presidential Teacher Award, a 2016 winner of her college’s Advising and Mentoring Award, and two-time recipient of her college’s Outstanding Teaching Award. She was chosen as the Fall Semester 2016 Commencement Speaker and recently received Ohio University’s Best Professor Award from the Athens News annual “Best Of” edition. Dr. Chabot received her PhD from Michigan State University and is an active member of the ACLP, currently serving on the Professional Resources Committee. During Spring Semester 2016, Dr. Chabot completed a Fulbright Teaching Scholar Award with the Child Life Studies department at McMaster University in Canada.

  • Helping Kids Succeed: Communication between Home and School when Children have a Chronic Illness

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 09/16/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    Chronic illness interferes with all areas of child development and growing numbers of children with chronic illness are attending school. Educators need to understand the child’s condition, including treatments and medications, and potential effects these may reasonably be expected to have on academic and behavioral functioning of the student in the classroom. Effective communication between parents and teachers is essential to understand the impact of chronic illness on a child’s development and school experiences so appropriate supports and instruction can be provided. This research supports the need for increased advocacy to support parents of a child with chronic illness in communicating their child’s needs. With the expanding world of healthcare and child life, child life specialists may find new roles in advocating for and assisting with meeting the needs of children with chronic illness in educational settings.

    Chronic illness interferes with all areas of child development and growing numbers of children with chronic illness are attending school. Educators need to understand the child’s condition, including treatments and medications, and potential effects these may reasonably be expected to have on academic and behavioral functioning of the student in the classroom. Effective communication between parents and teachers is essential to understand the impact of chronic illness on a child’s development and school experiences so appropriate supports and instruction can be provided. This research supports the need for increased advocacy to support parents of a child with chronic illness in communicating their child’s needs. With the expanding world of healthcare and child life, child life specialists may find new roles in advocating for and assisting with meeting the needs of children with chronic illness in educational settings.

    Learning  Objectives:

    1) Participants will be able to clearly articulate the impact of chronic illness on a child’s development.
    2) Participants will be able to explain the value of communication and collaboration between the parent of a child with a chronic illness and the child’s teacher.
    3) Participants will be able to identify parental expectations for their child chronic illness.
    4) Participants will be able to advocate for supports for children with chronic illness to be successful in school.

    Keri Edwards

    EdD, CCLS

    Keri worked clinically as a Certified Child Life Specialist for 10 years before becoming a full-time academic. As an academic, Keri serves as the Child Life Program Director and has recently completed her doctorate in Special Education. This presentation is based on her dissertation research.

  • Supporting Infants at Risk for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A 2-Generation Care Model

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 08/28/2019 at 2:30 PM (EDT)

    As a consequence of the opioid crisis, the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has continued to rise. Recent research has highlighted the importance of supportive, non-pharmacological care, ideally provided through rooming-in of the family, as the first line of treatment for all infants with in utero opioid exposure and NAS. This presentation will offer insight from one hospital’s experience in caring for mother and baby together, using a trauma-informed approach and evidence-based strategies, and the child life role in this collaborative care model. The goals and outcomes of this quality improvement initiative will be shared, including data on reducing length of stay and need for medication and improving patient experience.

    As a consequence of the opioid crisis, the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has continued to rise. Recent research has highlighted the importance of supportive, non-pharmacological care, ideally provided through rooming-in of the family, as the first line of treatment for all infants with in utero opioid exposure and NAS. This presentation will offer insight from one hospital’s experience in caring for mother and baby together, using a trauma-informed approach and evidence-based strategies, and the child life role in this collaborative care model. The goals and outcomes of this quality improvement initiative will be shared, including data on reducing length of stay and need for medication and improving patient experience.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Define relevant terms and consider causes and social factors associated with in utero opioid exposure
    • Identify the range of symptoms associated with neonatal withdrawal and non-pharmacological care strategies as first line of treatment
    • Describe the approach of one hospital program in caring for baby and mother together and the child life role in this collaborative care model
    • Acquire knowledge about trauma-informed care and the importance of its application with this patient population.

    Erin Munn

    CCLS

    For the past year, Erin has worked full-time in the child life component of a quality improvement initiative with infants at risk for NAS and their families. The team's goal has been to formalize an interdisciplinary program for providing carefully coordinated, evidence-based care to this growing patient population and their families, from outpatient prenatal and medication treatment for the mothers, to delivery and inpatient admission of the infants for monitoring and NAS treatment when indicated, to follow-up outpatient post-partum care for up to 1 year. Erin earned her Master of Science degree in human development and family studies in 1995 and have been a Certified Child Life Specialist for over 20 years.

  • You Can't Pour from an Empty Bucket: Stress & Self-Care in the Child Life Profession

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 08/12/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    This webinar will explore the stressors and personal risks inherent in the child life profession and other caring professions, will discuss the research & current theory and practice surrounding compassion fatigue, burnout, & stress, and will discuss research and best practices for self-care in the child life profession.

    This webinar will explore the stressors and personal risks inherent in the child life profession and other caring professions, will discuss the research & current theory and practice surrounding compassion fatigue, burnout, & stress, and will discuss research and best practices for self-care in the child life profession.

    Participants in this webinar will gain the ability to: 1. Define key terms related to stress and self-care, including compassion fatigue, burnout, and self-care.
    2. Identify types of self-care that have been shown effective at reducing negative effects of working in a caring profession.
    3. Identify stressors in their own work or environment that may be risk factors for developing compassion fatigue and burnout.
    4. Create realistic goals for self-care for themselves.
    5. Advocate for self-care at a departmental or organizational level.

    Katherine Baxley

    M.Ed., CCLS

    Katie has a bachelor's degree in Spanish as well as a master's of education in child studies with a concentration in pediatric health care, both from Vanderbilt University. She completed her internship at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in Memphis, TN, then completed a one-year fellowship at the Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit. She currently works as a PRN child life specialist at Beacon Children's Hospital in South Bend, IN, and has been a certified child life specialist since 2016. Katie also has experience working as a mental health case manager for children and adolescents, and is certified in youth mental health first aid.

  • Pushing our Professional Paradigm: Developing Data-Driven Teams and Practices

    Contains 4 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 06/12/2019 at 2:30 PM (EDT)

    High quality healthcare practices are derived from the careful and conscientious application of evidence to improve patients and family experiences and outcomes. However, in the child life profession, the demands of clinical responsibilities, student and employee supervision, and program administration can seem to leave little time in the day for systematic data collection, evaluation, and application. Therefore, this webinar will explore the importance of efficiently integrating data collection and analysis opportunities into existing child life programming to achieve clinical, academic, administrative, and research goals. Through inquiry and case examples, participants will identify opportunities for integrating intentional data acquisition and management practices to cultivate a data-driven culture of child life practice.

    High quality healthcare practices are derived from the careful and conscientious application of evidence to improve patients and family experiences and outcomes. However, in the child life profession, the demands of clinical responsibilities, student and employee supervision, and program administration can seem to leave little time in the day for systematic data collection, evaluation, and application. Therefore, this webinar will explore the importance of efficiently integrating data collection and analysis opportunities into existing child life programming to achieve clinical, academic, administrative, and research goals. Through inquiry and case examples, participants will identify opportunities for integrating intentional data acquisition and management practices to cultivate a data-driven culture of child life practice.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will explore the importance of data-driven care-planning and program administration for improving patient and family outcomes, clinical training programs, and employee satisfaction.
    2. Participants will identify characteristics of effective data-driven healthcare teams.
    3. Participants will explore case examples of clinical, empirical, academic, and administrative implementations of collaborative data collection and analysis.
    4. Participants will identify opportunities for integrating data collection and analysis into child life programming to promote best practices and improved quality of care.

    Jessika Boles

    PhD, CCLS

    Jessika Boles, PhD, CCLS is a child life specialist in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. She has nearly ten years of clinical experience, in addition to several years of academic and research training in applied child development, education, and psychology. She has published work in various medical and psychosocial journals, and has presented at national and international conferences in child development, psychology, education and child life. In her spare time, she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses related to working with children and families in hospitals and research methods, and is currently serving as the chair of the Academic Review Committee of the Association of Child Life Professionals.