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  • Child Life Services From Afar: An Educational and Resource-based Program to Support Adult Units in Supporting Children of Adult Patients at End of Life

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Children of adult patients at end of life is a growing area for child life services. This presentation explains the process and benefits of a program implemented to support children of adult patients at end of life without a child life position

    Children of adult patients at end of life is a growing area for child life services. This presentation explains the process and benefits of a program implemented to support children of adult patients at end of life without a child life position. Collaboration, education, and resources are highlighted as key components of the program, including statistics of program success.

    Objectives:
    Assess the need for prioritizing child life support for children of adult patients at end of life within a clinical setting.
    Explore techniques on appropriate education for adult unit staff regarding best practices when offering support and resources to families for children experiencing end of life.
    Discuss various age appropriate resources and community organizations to assist in providing ongoing support of children experiencing death, dying, and grief.

    Katie J. Riese

    CCLS

    Katie Riese is a Certified Child Life Specialist at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, where she is a member of the pediatric palliative care program. Katie also supports adult services within UW Health to provide resources and clinical support for children of adult patients at end of life. Katie has presented on her collaborative legacy work for palliative care children and families with the hospital photographer at national and regional palliative care and child life conferences. Academically, Katie is currently obtaining her Master of Arts Degree in Education at Edgewood College, where she also is a graduate assistant with the Edgewood College Child Life Program.

  • Is Parenting and Child Development Universal?: How Research on Parenting Influences Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Cultural norms about parenting practices strongly dictate how parents raise their children and can influence the acceptance, delivery, and effectiveness of parenting program interventions.

    Cultural norms about parenting practices strongly dictate how parents raise their children and can influence the acceptance, delivery, and effectiveness of parenting program interventions. This study sought to investigate parental knowledge, attitudes and practices among Arab parents in Qatar, identify knowledge practice gaps in order to develop a culturally sensitive parenting program, and determine the best delivery design for parenting programs. 

    Objectives:
    Define the culture studied including the challenges of research within the culture.
    Compare parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the studied culture and western cultures.
    Identify knowledge practice gaps that benefit from culturally sensitive parenting resources.

    Jenni L. Davis

    CCLS

    Sidra Medical

    Deirdrea A. Goltz

    Child Life Supervisor

    CCLS with experience in NICU, cardiology, and radiology. Passionate about research and evidenced based practice. Currently residing in Qatar and practicing child life abroad.

  • Growth Oriented Feedback: Methods for Making it Meaningful

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Feedback is an essential component of teaching and learning. The provision of meaningful, growth-oriented feedback has benefits for students, supervisors, academicians, as well as children, youth, and families

    Feedback is an essential component of teaching and learning. The provision of meaningful, growth-oriented feedback has benefits for students, supervisors, academicians, as well as children, youth, and families. Evidence will be applied to daily practice in this demonstration and discussion based session to enhance understanding of and increase participants confidence in the feedback process as it relates to clinical training. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss components and qualities of effective feedback and the evidence to support practice
    Discuss common barriers to providing effective feedback and the impact of ineffective feedback.
    Explore specific prompts, wording suggestions, and practices for delivery of effective feedback

    Katherine L. Bennett

    CCLS

    Katherine has worked as a child life specialist at Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt since 2001. She has worked with children and families in the areas of operative services, community outreach/education, PICC, inpatient medicine, and in the burn center. Currently, she serves as the educator for Child Life & Volunteer Services, planning and coordinating the clinical training experiences for emerging child life professionals, on-boarding new employees, working with the department's clinical advancement program and providing education about the needs of children in healthcare settings to colleagues both in and outside the Vanderbilt community. She has presented at international conferences about teaching medical play to students, developmental theory applied to hospitalized children, and teaching child life in the clinical and university settings. Her ACLP involvement includes work with the Internship Accreditation Task Force and editorial roles with ACLP Bulletin and Focus. She continues to provide direct patient care by supporting the child life team when extra coverage is needed.

  • Behavioral Approaches to Dental Care for Patients with Developmental and Behavioral Disabilities

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Children with autism and other developmental disabilities often have behaviors and sensitivities that make dental treatment one of the most difficult types of healthcare for them to receive

    Children with autism and other developmental disabilities often have behaviors and sensitivities that make dental treatment one of the most difficult types of healthcare for them to receive. Follow a pediatric dental team of a child life specialist and hygienist to learn strategies and adaptations to best provide support for patients with developmental and behavioral conditions in pediatric dentistry. 

    Objectives:
    Explore the need for child life services in pediatric dentistry, including current evidence-based need for individualizing healthcare for patients with developmental delays, as well as challenging and aggressive behaviors.
    Discuss how interdisciplinary collaboration, when combined with supportive interventions, leads to increased positive outcomes for patients, families, and the dental team.
    Explore child life techniques can be adapted for use with children with special needs and challenging behaviors in the healthcare setting to minimize distress and maximize coping during dental encounters.
    Discuss how to enhance their confidence and competence when providing services for patients with developmental delays and challenging behaviors.

    Kerri Birkett

    CCLS

    erri has been a child life specialist for nine years, working at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center for the past five years as a clinician working in the Adaptive Care Team for the outpatient department, facilitating and providing support during healthcare encounters for patients with developmental and behavioral challenges. Kerri is a handler to Cincinnati’s first hospital facility dog, incorporating the use of animal-assisted therapy in her daily practice. Kerri currently serves on the Professional Inquiry Council at Cincinnati Children’s and is a member of the Child Life Council’s Research Committee: Educational and Awareness Subcommittee. Kerri is currently leading a team to develop an evidence-based practice recommendation related to canine animal-assisted therapy in the healthcare setting. Kerri has been an integral member on a number of evidence-based practice projects at Cincinnati Children’s and mentors interns through their own evidence-based practice projects. Kerri is currently is completing an IRB approved research study on the effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy as an intervention to reduce pain and distress during outpatient botulinum toxin injections.

  • Easy as ABC: Creating a Policy for Non-Pharmacological Pain Management in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Research focuses on the value of providing non-pharmacological pain management for comfort during procedures in the NICU. This presentation describes the way one NICU team collaborated, researched, and implemented an adaptation of a system-wide policy based on the known needs of their specific neonatal and infant population

    Research focuses on the value of providing non-pharmacological pain management for comfort during procedures in the NICU. This presentation describes the way one NICU team collaborated, researched, and implemented an adaptation of a system-wide policy based on the known needs of their specific neonatal and infant population. Positive results came from providing consistent, developmentally-appropriate support during painful procedures.

    Objectives:
    Explore the developmental considerations and specific needs of infants and neonates within a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).
    Explore steps towards implementation of new guidelines for treating stress and pain in infants.
    Explore ways to educate and effectively communicate with the multidisciplinary team regarding newly created policies and guidelines.

    Morgan M. Livingstone

    Child Life Officer/Clinical Supervisor

    Morgan Livingstone has been passionately working in a Child Life community based child life practice since 2003.
    Morgan works locally in children's homes, hospitals, hospices and clinics providing traditional child life supports and preparations to children of all ages facing serious illness, surviving trauma, anxiety, illness of a family member, and loss/bereavement.
    Morgan also works in many low income countries around the world providing child life clinical supervision, education and hands on learning to build locally sustainable, locally staffed, culturally appropriate child life programs.

    Hailey E. Simpson

    CCLS

    Hailey Simpson graduated with a master’s degree in Human Development and Family Sciences from The University of Georgia in 2017. Following graduate school, Hailey completed her clinical child life internship at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Since then she has worked at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston in their Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. In addition to her clinical role, Hailey serves on many hospital and departmental committees including the NICU Neuroprotective Care Council. During her time in the NICU she has championed many unit initiatives including work on research-based developmental care practices, family visitation policies, sibling education & support, and non-pharmacological pain management practices. She is passionate about advocating for the littlest of patients and supporting their families during the hospitalization.

  • Establishing the Role of Child Life as the Stem Cell Transplant Donor Advocate for Donors of Pediatric and Adult Patients

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Research has shown pediatric patients serving as donors for stem cell transplants often lack preparation, express fears about the transplant process, and almost all experience a lack of choice in the donation process (Pentz et al., 2014).

    Research has shown pediatric patients serving as donors for stem cell transplants often lack preparation, express fears about the transplant process, and almost all experience a lack of choice in the donation process (Pentz et al., 2014). This session will recognize the necessity of requiring child life as an advocate for the donor throughout the entirety of the stem cell transplant process. 

    Objectives:
    Explore the significance of the donor advocate role through the entirety of the stem cell transplant process.
    Discuss and review an assessment tool created by child life specialists to implement at their own facility.
    Identify specific obstacles when working with children in unique familial circumstances during the transplant process.

    Brittany L. Blake

    CCLS

    Brittany Blake has been a Certified Child Life Specialist for over 8 years and has served patients in several areas, including hematology/oncology, PICU, day surgery, and chronic illness. She has a MS degree in Child Development with an emphasis in Child Life from Texas Woman's University. Currently, Brittany is a full time instructor of Child Life at Harding University. Brittany also serves as the Chair-Elect for the ACLP Conference Program Committee.

    Emily Bell Hood

    CCLS

    Medical City Children's Hospital

  • There's No Place Like Home: A Community-Based Palliative Care and Hospice Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This presentation will highlight one outpatient, community-based program that provides compassionate care to patients and families on either palliative care or hospice services from two pediatric hospitals.

    This presentation will highlight one outpatient, community-based program that provides compassionate care to patients and families on either palliative care or hospice services from two pediatric hospitals. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from the insights gained by both a community-based child life specialist and a medical social worker and will examine the differences between hospital and community-based practices. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss the structure and goals of an innovative community-based palliative care and hospice program.
    Explore child life and medical social work community-based practice.
    Explore the opportunities and obstacles faced in a community-based clinical practice and make application for safety and professional boundaries in field work.

    Stephanie Barta

    CCLS

    Stephanie is a certified child life specialist with six years of experience in high acuity patient care settings. Stephanie graduated from the University of Iowa with a BS in Child Life and minors in Spanish and Theatre Arts. Stephanie was a child life specialist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for five years before accepting her position as a community child life specialist with Methodist Le Bonehur Healthcare in the Quality of Life for All Kids Program in Memphis, TN. This program provides compassionate care to palliative and hospice eligible patients and families in hospital housing facilities and in the Memphis community.

    Cheryl Garrett-Fergerson

    Licensed Master Social Worker

    Cheryl Fergerson is a Licensed Master Social Worker. She is currently working the Quality of Life for All Kids (QoLA) program in the Methodist Lebonheur Healthcare System as a Medical Social Worker. Prior to working with QoLA, Cheryl worked with Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit as a medical social worker. She also has more than 14 years of experience in child welfare with The Tennessee Department of Children's Services. She was responsible for the supervision of five counties for Child Protective Services, Foster Care, and Juvenile Justice Programming. Cheryl also serves as an adjunct professor in the University Of Memphis School Of Social Work and the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) School of Social Work. She completed her Bachelor's Degree at The University of Memphis in Sociology. Her Master's degree was also obtained from The University of Memphis in Social Work. Cheryl is a Licensed Master Social Worker in the states of Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi. She is also currently pursuing her Doctorate Degree in Social Work (DSW) at Capella University. She is in candidacy now, will have final approval of her dissertation, and plans to graduate later in 2019. The title of her dissertation is ACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences) and Self‐care: An Examination of Child Protective Services Investigators.

  • What Do Kids Express Online About Illness?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This presentation will outline research conducted from analyzing 3.8 million online interactions about illness from pediatric patients

    This presentation will outline research conducted from analyzing 3.8 million online interactions about illness from pediatric patients. For example, 53% express uncertainty (fear, anxiety, feeling helpless), 38% express desperation (anger, resentment, frustration), and 9% express confidence (control, appreciation, empowerment). This session details strategies to engage with and support young people with serious illness online.

     Objectives:
    Identify places where young patients interact online about their illness.
    Explore the three primary reasons that young people choose to interact online about illness.
    Explore supporting young people with serious illness online.

    Kristi Pikiewicz

    Educational Psychologist

    After working as a middle school teacher in Bozeman, MT, I returned to school to earn my PhD in Clinical Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Carpinteria, CA, with a dissertation exploring posttraumatic growth in parents of chronically ill children. I completed internship at the Nan Tolbert Nurturing Center in Ojai, CA, and postdoctoral fellowship at the Boulder Institute for Psychotherapy and Research. Now I work in private practice and as an Educational Psychologist at Mackintosh Academy in Boulder, CO.

  • Ambiguity or Uncertainty? Exploring Stress in Child Life Specialists

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This presentation shares results of a study investigating the role intolerance of uncertainty might play in the stress CCLS experience. Professional quality of life was also measured

    This presentation shares results of a study investigating the role intolerance of uncertainty might play in the stress CCLS experience. Professional quality of life was also measured. The presentation also includes information on current mindfulness research and the role of meditation and mindfulness in intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety. There are no studies describing mindfulness-based interventions with CCLS. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss mindfulness, meditation, and intolerance of uncertainty.
    Explore the role intolerance of uncertainty might play in doing the work of a child life specialist.
    Explore how mindfulness may impact intolerance of uncertainty and professional quality of life.
    Discuss the steps necessary to carrying out research in a practice setting.

    Megan K. Abbott

    CCLS

    Stephanie Andrews

    Director of Program Development

    Stephanie is the Director of Program Development at the Center for Professional Well-Being at Children’s Mercy, Kansas City. The only University of Massachusetts certified MBSR teacher in the area, she leads MBSR teaching at Children’s Mercy. She also teachers other mindfulness-based interventions, provides support to staff, and provides family therapy. Stephanie led the establishment of ASAP (Aligning Support Across Providers), a response to staff after distressing events. She received her Master’s degree in social work from the University Of Kansas and completed a fellowship at the Menninger Clinic.

    Sandra Ganey

    Presenter

    Kelly Trowbridge

    CCLS

    Kelly works at Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City in the Center for Professional Well-Being. She participates in research, teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and other mindfulness-based interventions, provides support to staff, and provides family therapy. She received an undergraduate degree in Special Education from the University of Wisconsin, a Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Kansas, and a PhD from the University of Kansas Medical Center. She has also authored several publications.

  • Becoming the Difference: Building Positive Staff Relationships in Healthcare

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Child life specialists promote mutual respect, a common purpose, and open communication with the healthcare team while ensuring quality care for patients and families.

    Child life specialists promote mutual respect, a common purpose, and open communication with the healthcare team while ensuring quality care for patients and families. This session will provide participants with a basic overview of how to establish productive staff relationships as well as discuss strategies and provide tools needed to sustain relationships, solidify child life services, and increase collaboration.

     Objectives:
    Discuss the need and benefits of establishing positive relationships with nursing, interdisciplinary, and medical professionals.
    Explore child life services to help promote collaboration in order to maximize patient and family satisfaction in the healthcare setting.
    Explore the variety of personalities, temperaments, and work cultures a child life specialist may encounter.

    Kayla C. Harrison

    CCLS

    Kayla Harrison has been a Certified Child Life Specialist at Children’s Health in Dallas since 2014. During her time at Children’s, Kayla has worked in the Heart Center – CVICU, inpatient floor and clinic. Within the Heart Center, Kayla has provided formal education with new employees and nursing students regarding child life services. As a specialist responsible for both an ICU and inpatient setting, Kayla has to balance working with a variety of personalities and work styles. Outside of the Heart Center, Kayla is committed to students, both serving on the student programming committee and as as student supervisor, which affords her the opportunity to mentor a wide range of young professionals.

    Keeley Machen

    CCLS

    Keeley has been a Certified Child Life Specialist since 2016. She is currently employed at Children's Health Dallas and spent two years as the Emergency Department Child Life Specialist. Within the Emergency Department Keeley provided formal education to new employees, volunteers, and local fire chiefs on the importance of Child Life. Currently she is the Child Life Specialist for Gastroenterology and Medical Surgery, which has allowed her to work with variety of patients and medical staff professionals. Additionally, Keeley is the chair of the Child Life Recognition Committee which helps increase staff morale and awareness of child life hospital wide.

    Elizabeth E. Peterson

    CCLS

    Lizzy has a been a Certified Child Life Specialist since 2014. She has spent four years in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Children’s Health Dallas, which serves a variety of surgical and medical conditions, newborns through adolescence. Through her clinical role, Lizzy has the opportunity to work with a variety of healthcare professionals and personalities on a daily basis. She assists with her units recognition and teamwork committee and twice a year attends Camp Sol, a weekend retreat for siblings and families experiencing the death of a child. In addition to her clinical role, Lizzy is a member of her department’s Student Programming Committee and serves as the child life representative on the hospital wide Schwartz Center Rounds and ECMO Reunion committees. Lizzy has experience presenting to hospital staff, child life peers, and volunteers on the topics of child life services, death, and bereavement.