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  • Taking the Road Less Traveled: Child Life Community-Based Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    The need for alternative and non-traditional placements for child life specialists in the community has increased as the profession of hild life has diversified. This session will explore complementary settings for child life work in schools and communities in support of children’s psychosocial, physical and behavioral health needs.

    The need for alternative and non-traditional placements for child life specialists in the community has increased as the profession of  hild life has diversified. This session will explore  complementary settings for child life work in schools and communities in support of children’s psychosocial, physical and behavioral health needs.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Describe current child life services and career opportunities in alternative and non-traditional child life settings and environments.
    ■ Identify marketable education, clinical skills, experience and training to promote child life specialist employment outside of the hospital environment.
    ■ Acquire skills and knowledge to develop a community-based child life alternative internship program.
    ■ Describe the child life specialist’s role within the alternative setting with relevance to child life practice.
    ■ Explain the value of providing child life services in community-based practice to meet the future need and direction of the profession.

  • How to Engage Patients and Medical Professionals in a Pre-surgical Preparation Workshop

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    Teens and young adults undergoing complicated surgical procedures often experience anxiety and psychosocial concerns that impact their pre- and post-surgery adjustment. Offering formal education and support to patients and families undergoing procedures often results in an increased ability to cope with the surgical process and improved outcomes. The creation of a multidisciplinary preparation course for teenagers undergoing orthognathic surgery has created positive post-surgical outcomes in the eyes of the teenager, parent and physicians.

    Teens and young adults undergoing complicated surgical procedures often experience anxiety and psychosocial concerns that impact their pre- and post-surgery adjustment. Offering formal education and support to patients and families undergoing procedures often results in an increased ability to cope with the surgical process and improved outcomes. The creation of a multidisciplinary preparation course for teenagers undergoing orthognathic surgery has created positive post-surgical outcomes in the eyes of the teenager, parent and physicians.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    ■ Discuss the benefit of preparing adolescents undergoing complicated surgeries by offering a workshop that incorporates medical professionals and peer mentors.
    ■ Promote long-term coping and adjustment to future health care challenges for patients.
    ■ Participants will be provided documents that provide a framework for the participants to conduct a preparation workshop in their medical setting that can be adapted to a diagnosis that is of their preference.

  • Re-imagining the Volunteer Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    ​This presentation will share one hospital’s re-invention of their volunteer program. The change from multiple supervisors to one, adding team building and education opportunities, and regular volunteer-run playroom activities were implemented. As a result, the volunteer program is more robust, yielding favorable outcomes for patients, families, staff, and the volunteers themselves.

    This presentation will share one hospital’s re-invention of their volunteer program. The change from multiple supervisors to one, adding team building and education opportunities, and regular volunteer-run playroom activities were implemented. As a result, the volunteer program is more robust, yielding favorable outcomes for patients, families, staff, and the volunteers themselves.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    ■ Identify current research findings regarding supervisory styles that enhance the retention of volunteers.
    ■ Draw inspiration from one child life department that completed a full-scale overhaul of their volunteer program to address identified needs, improve the quality of their volunteer resources.
    ■ Identify resources to adapt to your volunteer program.

  • The Window to the Mind: Using Music for Hospitalized Children with Special Needs

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    Children with special needs benefit from the creative and family-centered support of child life specialists and music therapists. Learn the most up to date diagnostic information for those with developmental disabilities and how music can be used to address physical, emotional, and cognitive needs as part of a holistic, family-centered model of care.

    Children with special needs benefit from the creative and family-centered support of child life specialists and music therapists. Learn the most up to date diagnostic information for those with developmental disabilities and how music can be used to address physical, emotional, and cognitive needs as part of a holistic, family-centered model of care.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Identify current diagnostic information for children with developmental delays and disorders.
    ■ Identify common needs for hospitalized children with developmental delays and disorders.
    ■ Describe the unique role of music in meeting the needs of children with developmental delays and disorders, and how music can be incorporated into child life practice.
    ■ Identify when collaboration with a music therapist is indicated and how to facilitate best-practice techniques within a collaborative approach.
    ■ Describe current trends in hospitalization for children with special needs, and where music therapy resources can be found for hospitals without music therapy.

  • “Innovation, Imagination, Inspiration” Talks

    Contains 3 Component(s), 2 credits offered

    Stir your imagination and be inspired. Come listen and learn during these three, 30-minute presentations.

    Stir your imagination and be inspired. Come listen and learn during these three, 30-minute presentations.  Wee Read: A `Novel’ Approach to Promoting Bonding and Brain Development in the NICU, Diane Dingley, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN / Reaching Beyond the Walls of the Hospital: Child Life in Schools, Melissa Stover, Children’s Mercy Hospital , Kansas City, MO / Speaking their iLanguage: Creating Innovating and Relevant Diagnostic Teaching Tools that Speak to Today’s Patient, Morgan Stojanowski, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY; Luis Borges, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY; Jamie Siegel, MS, CCLS, Mount Saint Medical Center, New York, NY

  • Using Intensive Preparation Strategies for Patients with Unique Learning Styles and a History of Healthcare-related Trauma

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Intensive preparation strategies can be utilized to overcome barriers to successful healthcare encounters for patients with unique learning styles and traumatic past healthcare experiences. When traditional preparation trategies aren’t enough, tailored preparation can equip patients with the information and coping skills needed to successfully master a challenging healthcare experience.

    Intensive preparation strategies can be utilized to overcome barriers to successful healthcare encounters for patients with unique learning styles and traumatic past healthcare experiences. When traditional preparation  trategies aren’t enough, tailored preparation can equip patients with the information and coping skills needed to successfully master a challenging healthcare experience.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Verbalize the target population and benefits of intensive preparation.
    ■ Recognize how intensive preparationstrategies lead to increased positive outcomes for patients, families, and the healthcare team.
    ■ Develop an enhanced understanding of the unique psychosocial needs of patients with diverse learning styles and history of healthcare-related trauma in the
    medical setting.
    ■ Demonstrate a variety of preparation and support strategies leading to successful healthcare encounters for patients with diverse learning styles and history of
    healthcare-related trauma.

  • Start the Spark: Learning S’more About In-hospital Camp Programming

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    ​Many camp programs are facilitated in community settings, but we will explore the creative process for developing a camp program within the hospital environment. Activity programming is crucial when helping patients cope with hospitalization and we will provide attendees with the necessary tools to implement camp programming within their own facility.

    Many camp programs are facilitated in community settings, but we will explore the creative process for developing a camp program within the hospital environment. Activity programming is crucial when helping patients cope with hospitalization and we will provide attendees with the necessary tools to implement camp programming within their own facility.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: ■ Understand this hospital’s camp program and the therapeutic benefits for patients and families.
    ■ Utilize tools and techniques to encourage child life and interdisciplinary team participation in camp activities. ■ Recognize strategies to involve the community and promote camp programming to hospital administration. ■ Engage in hands on activities to learn how to create camp programming designed for the hospital environment.

  • Helping Children Connect With Their Emotions

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    This presentation will explore the value of working with children to assess their emotional development. It will emphasize how one can better support children in identifying and expressing their feelings. Participants will be inspired with research, case studies, and interventions aimed at promoting emotional literacy associated with healthcare experiences.

    This presentation will explore the value of working with children to assess their emotional development. It will emphasize how one can better support children in identifying and expressing their feelings. Participants will
    be inspired with research, case studies, and interventions aimed at promoting emotional literacy associated with healthcare experiences.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Understand the difference between emotions and feelings and how they develop in children.
    ■ Enhance child life interventions to develop children’s emotional literacy.
    ■ Acquire resources and activities to help children learn to identify and express their feelings.

  • Where Do We Start?: Developing and Sustaining a Family-Driven Unit-Based Advisory Council

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Family advisory councils effectively bring about positive changes that promote family-centered care within a hospital unit. This presentation will discuss how a family advisory council was established in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, including advisor recruitment, project/goal development and generating staff buy-in. The perspective of a current family advisor will also be included.

    Family advisory councils effectively bring about positive changes that promote family-centered care within a hospital unit. This presentation will discuss how a family advisory council was established in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, including advisor recruitment, project/goal development and generating staff buy-in.  The perspective of a current family advisor will also be included.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Discuss the ways a family advisory council can contribute to family-centered care within a hospital unit.
    ■ List three strategies for recruiting potential family members to participate on a family advisory council.
    ■ Describe three tactics for gaining administrative support and unit staff buy-in.
    ■ Explain the importance of allowing family advisors to guide the council in developing goals and projects.

  • Specialized Services for Unique Populations in Pediatric Subspecialty Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.5 credits offered

    Patients and families with unique conditions will continue to pursue care at established, geographically-dispersed, centers of excellence. From strategies for collaboration with the medical team to the delivery of therapeutic interventions, child life specialists have many opportunities to provide services that support the distinctive needs of subspecialty populations.

    Patients and families with unique conditions will continue to pursue care at established, geographically-dispersed, centers of excellence. From strategies for collaboration with the medical team to the delivery of therapeutic interventions, child life specialists have many opportunities to provide services that support the distinctive needs of subspecialty populations.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    ■ Define circumstances in the current health care environment that increase the need for child life specialists to develop competence with unique, subspecialty populations.
    ■ Identify the characteristics of unique, subspecialty populations that require specialized interventions.
    ■ Describe strategies for supporting the needs of subspecialty populations in outpatient and inpatient settings.
    ■ Develop specific strategies for enhancing existing services provided to subspecialty populations in their clinical setting.