Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Becoming the Difference: Building Positive Staff Relationships in Healthcare

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Child life specialists promote mutual respect, a common purpose, and open communication with the healthcare team while ensuring quality care for patients and families.

    Child life specialists promote mutual respect, a common purpose, and open communication with the healthcare team while ensuring quality care for patients and families. This session will provide participants with a basic overview of how to establish productive staff relationships as well as discuss strategies and provide tools needed to sustain relationships, solidify child life services, and increase collaboration.

     Objectives:
    Discuss the need and benefits of establishing positive relationships with nursing, interdisciplinary, and medical professionals.
    Explore child life services to help promote collaboration in order to maximize patient and family satisfaction in the healthcare setting.
    Explore the variety of personalities, temperaments, and work cultures a child life specialist may encounter.

    Kayla C. Harrison

    CCLS

    Kayla Harrison has been a Certified Child Life Specialist at Children’s Health in Dallas since 2014. During her time at Children’s, Kayla has worked in the Heart Center – CVICU, inpatient floor and clinic. Within the Heart Center, Kayla has provided formal education with new employees and nursing students regarding child life services. As a specialist responsible for both an ICU and inpatient setting, Kayla has to balance working with a variety of personalities and work styles. Outside of the Heart Center, Kayla is committed to students, both serving on the student programming committee and as as student supervisor, which affords her the opportunity to mentor a wide range of young professionals.

    Keeley Machen

    CCLS

    Keeley has been a Certified Child Life Specialist since 2016. She is currently employed at Children's Health Dallas and spent two years as the Emergency Department Child Life Specialist. Within the Emergency Department Keeley provided formal education to new employees, volunteers, and local fire chiefs on the importance of Child Life. Currently she is the Child Life Specialist for Gastroenterology and Medical Surgery, which has allowed her to work with variety of patients and medical staff professionals. Additionally, Keeley is the chair of the Child Life Recognition Committee which helps increase staff morale and awareness of child life hospital wide.

    Elizabeth E. Peterson

    CCLS

    Lizzy has a been a Certified Child Life Specialist since 2014. She has spent four years in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Children’s Health Dallas, which serves a variety of surgical and medical conditions, newborns through adolescence. Through her clinical role, Lizzy has the opportunity to work with a variety of healthcare professionals and personalities on a daily basis. She assists with her units recognition and teamwork committee and twice a year attends Camp Sol, a weekend retreat for siblings and families experiencing the death of a child. In addition to her clinical role, Lizzy is a member of her department’s Student Programming Committee and serves as the child life representative on the hospital wide Schwartz Center Rounds and ECMO Reunion committees. Lizzy has experience presenting to hospital staff, child life peers, and volunteers on the topics of child life services, death, and bereavement.

  • Expanding Procedural Comfort Initiatives and Self-advocacy from Pediatrics to Adult Care Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This session will provide insights about how to use interdisciplinary partnerships to meet both institutional and professional goals. A journey of partnerships with patients and leadership, evidence utilization and persistence has resulted in a system-wide change to reduce procedural pain and anxiety with adult and pediatric patients.

    This session will provide insights about how to use interdisciplinary partnerships to meet both institutional and professional goals. A journey of partnerships with patients and leadership, evidence utilization and persistence has resulted in a system-wide change to reduce procedural pain and anxiety with adult and pediatric patients.

    Objectives:
    Discuss three evidence based strategies for decreasing pain and anxiety with needlesticks and procedures.
    Explore the components and benefits of an individualized Poke and Procedural Comfort Plan.
    Explore strategies that help overcome challenges of implementing evidence based practices and building bridges for change.

    Michelle Churches

    Clinical Affairs Staff Specialist

    Michelle Churches is a Clinical Affairs Staff Specialist for the Office of Clinical Affairs Accreditation and Regulatory for Michigan Medicine in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Michelle received her undergraduate degree from Wayne State University and her MSN in Health Systems Leadership graduate degree from Gonzaga University. Churches has practiced pediatric nursing for over twenty-five years and has been involved in pain management, quality improvement and evidence based practice changes. She has participated in the development of the individualized procedural plan in pediatrics and is part of the implementation team leading education to bring this initiative to the adult care settings in ambulatory and inpatient settings at Michigan Medicine. Churches was a nurse lead for support in development of nursing guidelines for Procedural Pain and Anxiety Management. She was a team lead at Kellogg Eye Center at Michigan Medicine for the implementation of the Poke Plan in the adult ophthalmic patient population. Churches has worked in emergency medicine, ambulatory care settings, inpatient and perioperative areas for adult and pediatric patients. She utilized her change management knowledge and experience to support quality and safety initiatives and now continues to work to support strategies and education for Michigan Medicine’s Office of Clinical Affairs to ensure accreditation and regulatory compliance across the enterprise. Improved patient experience is always her goal.

    Nancy Deeb

    Patient/Family Advisor

    Nancy Deeb is a patient/family advisor at Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan and is on the comfort initiatives team to roll out the Poke Plan institution wide. She has experience being a patient at Michigan Medicine as well as a parent of a patient, spouse of a patient and daughter of a patient. Nancy has a B.S.N. from the University of Michigan. She worked in nursing at The University of Michigan as a floor nurse, ICU nurse, nursing administrator, outpatient nurse, and clinical research coordinator. She is currently retired.

    Sandra Merkel

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Acute Pain Service

    Sandra Merkel was Clinical Nurse Specialist for the Pediatric Acute Pain Service at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and an Adjunct Nursing Instructor at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Sandra received her undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa and her graduate degree from the University of Michigan. Merkel has practiced pediatric nursing for over forty years and has been involved in pain management, quality improvement and evidence based practice changes. She and colleagues developed and validity the FLACC pain assessment tool which is utilized by clinicians throughout the country and world. Merkel has also participated in the development and revision of two position papers for the American Society of Pain Management Nursing. Merkel was the nurse lead in the development of the Poke Plan and develop of nursing guidelines for Procedural Pain and Anxiety Management. She was the project coordinator for the implementation of the Poke Plan in the adult ophthalmic patient population. After retirement Merkel continues to work with Pain Management Nursing and participates in the strategies and education for Michigan Medicine’s health system’s Poke and Procedure Program.

    Julie R. Piazza

    CCLS

    A Certified Child Life Specialist for over 30 years serving both pediatric inpatients and outpatients and their families in a large university teaching hospital, Julie Piazza has collaborated with multidisciplinary teams to facilitate patient and family centered initiatives hospital and system wide, many of these initiatives have been related to reducing pain and anxiety with needlesticks and procedures. An educator for medical and nursing students, Julie has served as an adjunct professor and guest lecturer for the child life degree program and residential colleges at three local universities. Julie has presented at several regional, national and international conferences for: child life, community partnership, innovation, healthcare informatics, social work, pediatric anesthesia, pain management, quality improvement, leadership, science and technology, and patient family centered care.
    Areas of Expertise:
    • Pediatric Pain Management
    • Teambuilding and Leadership
    • Patient Family Centered Care
    • Healing Environments
    • Community Partnerships
    • Staff Development: Training, Mentoring & Leading
    • Creating and Telling the Story
    • Therapeutic Interventions
    • Respite and Comfort Initiatives across the Age Span

    Credentials: MS BS CCLS Degree: Masters of Science Year: 1984
    School: Wheelock College Major: Children’s Health Care Administration
    Degree: Bachelors of Science Year: 1981 School: Iowa State University Major: Child Development
    Child Life Certification: 1987-2022 Contact Information: julipiaz@med.umich.edu julipiaz1@gmail.com 734-368-2907 mobile

  • Putting Our Pieces Together: An Inter-Professional Approach to Becoming a Sensory-Friendly Hospital

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​In a country with a rising prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) diagnoses, health care facilities need to evolve their approach in caring for these patients.

    In a country with a rising prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) diagnoses, health care facilities need to evolve their approach in caring for these patients. Spearheaded by child life specialists, this hospital assembled an inter-professional team to initiate a sensory-friendly culture change to provide better and safer care for pediatric patients with ASD and SPD. 

    Objectives:
    Explore the basics of sensory processing and sensory profiles.
    Explore successful strategies and roadblocks encountered in changing a culture to become more sensory-friendly.
    Identify an inter-professional team strategy to achieve increased staff comfort in caring for patients with ASD/SPD.

    Nicole Johnson

    Cardiac Child Life Specialist

    Inova Children's Hospital

  • Charting the Course for Parental Presence in the Operating Room

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Parental presence during anesthetic induction - a review of one hospital's journey to implementing a successful program that is responsive to the needs of children, families and staff and that is sustainable over the long-term

    Parental presence during anesthetic induction - a review of one hospital's journey to implementing a successful program that is responsive to the needs of children, families and staff and that is sustainable over the long-term. Examine key elements to initiating a viable program and creative ways to ensuring its success. 

    Objectives:
    Discuss the current literature on parental presence during induction of anesthetic and the evolution of its practice.
    Explore effective ways to initiate a parental presence during induction program.
    Discover creative ways to sustain a parental presence during induction program in spite of economic challenges and changes to health care provision and staffing.

    Leigh Banfield

    CCLS

    Leigh Banfield, BASc., CCLS has been a child life specialist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario for the past 18 years. She has a bachelor’s degree in Family and Social Relations from the University of Guelph and a post graduate diploma in Child Life Studies from McMaster University. She has worked in the emergency department and inpatient surgery, but has spent the last 14 years working in perioperative services covering patients and families in the pre-assessment clinic, surgical day unit, operating room, and post-anesthetic unit. Leigh has landed coverage in parenting magazines and broadcast outlets lending her expertise around preparing children and youth for surgery. Leigh’s career ambitions have led her to develop several patient and family-centered care initiatives including the parental presence at induction program. This program empowers families to support their children in the operating room creating positive outcomes for children, youth and families.

  • Conducting Research with Children and Parents in the Hospital: Challenges, Strategies, and Findings From a Study Evaluating the Role of Child Life Specialists

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation will detail the process of conducting a quantitative study examining child and parent psychosocial experiences during child hospitalization. The results indicate families who received child life services tended to demonstrate better outcomes.

    This presentation will detail the process of conducting a quantitative study examining child and parent psychosocial experiences during child hospitalization. The results indicate families who received child life services tended to demonstrate better outcomes. Presenters will discuss challenges in conducting research in the hospital environment and collecting dyadic data as well as implications for practice and for future research.

    Objectives:
    Discuss current research support for Child Life Specialist services.
    Discuss the benefits of engaging in research to demonstrate the efficacy of child life services.
    Explore challenges in conducting research in a hospital environment.

    Amy Claridge

    CCLS

    Dr. Amy Claridge is an associate professor in family and child life at Central Washington University and a licensed marriage and family therapist. She is the director of the Family and Child Life master's program at CWU and is engaged in child life research in collaboration with graduate students. She is the chair-elect of the ACLP Research Proposal Subcommittee.

    Lauren Hajec

    Presenter

    Lindsay Montgomery

    CCLS

    My name is Lindsay Montgomery and I am currently a Certified Child Life Specialist at Seattle Children's Hospital. I have my undergraduate and graduate degrees from Central Washington University. I worked closely with the university to help create the first Child Life degree program in the northwest. Throughout my graduate degree, I taught courses for the university on a teaching assistantship and continued to teach as an adjunct instructor following graduation. I completed my thesis on the efficacy of child life services by collecting data from a nearby children’s hospital as the start of what is now a larger longitudinal study. Beginning at Seattle Children's as a per diem across all units, I then moved to my role in the Emergency Department before settling into my current home on the inpatient cancer care unit. I am passionate about balancing my love for patient care with my goals to explore empirically-based advances in child life services.

  • Patient Remembrance: A Model for Processing the Death of a Patient Through Departmental Social Support

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Death is an inevitable component within the child life profession that often correlates with compassion fatigue and burnout. This presentation aims to explore a model of one child life department's structured staff intervention related to processing the death of patients.

    Death is an inevitable component within the child life profession that often correlates with compassion fatigue and burnout. This presentation aims to explore a model of one child life department's structured staff intervention related to processing the death of patients. Furthermore, this presentation will explore the potential need to create an individualized model for child life specialists to incorporate within their own institutions.

    Objectives:
    Explore the need for staff interventions related to processing the death of patients in the health care field.
    Explore one department's structured staff intervention that aims to provide child life specialists an opportunity to process the death of patients.
    Discuss grief processing into individualized model .

    Katie Elizabeth Greer

    CCLS

    Katie Greer earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Family Studies and Human Development at The University of Arizona. She then continued her education and completed a Master of Arts in Education with an emphasis in Child Life in Hospitals at Mills College in Oakland, California. Katie has been working as a child life specialist since January of 2017 and joined the child life team at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in January of 2018. She currently works with patients of all ages in the assessment/triage as well as procedure outpatient areas. Katie’s passion for grief related topics and interventions inspire her to look at ways in which staff may benefit from further supportive services utilizing theories and concepts within the field of child life.

    Shandra Taylor

    CCLS

    Shandra Taylor earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from The University of Louisville. She continued her education at Towson University, where she completed her Master of Science degree in Child Life, Administration, and Family Collaboration. Shandra joined the child life team at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in January of 2018, where she currently provides services to patients of all ages in diagnostic imaging and interventional radiology.

  • Take a Second Look at that Therapeutic Book: Using Bibliotherapy as a Child Life Specialist

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Child life specialists facilitate conversations about complex issues and intimidating healthcare topics. Using bibliotherapy to pair books with therapeutic activities promotes relatable and non-threatening conversations about challenging issues.

    Child life specialists facilitate conversations about complex issues and intimidating healthcare topics. Using bibliotherapy to pair books with therapeutic activities promotes relatable and non-threatening conversations about challenging issues. The presenters will describe bibliotherapy through a review of the literature and case examples from their experiences in various medical settings. 

    Objectives:
    Explore the benefits of the three types of bibliotherapy and how they are applicable to their practice.
    Discuss new strategies for utilizing the types of bibliotherapy effectively through specific case examples and book recommendations.
    Discuss how one free standing children's hospital created an annotated and reviewed therapeutic library for clinical and caregiver use
    Explore creative solutions of how to provide bibliotherapy to patients and siblings experiencing medical stressors

    Kate Carpenter

    CCLS

    Kate Carpenter has been a certified child life specialist for the last 9 years with her master’s degree in education from the University of Pennsylvania. She has worked in a variety of settings, including the emergency department, outpatient clinics, and for the last 6 years as the inpatient pulmonary, lung transplant, and complex care child life specialist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Prior to becoming a certified child life specialist, she was an elementary school teacher in an inclusive classroom where she taught 6th grade.
    Kate facilitates the hospital’s Preparation and Coping Committee, co-coordinates a sibling program known as Sibshops, and she has co-authored a book for children with Cystic Fibrosis. Additionally, Kate has been committed to research in the field of child life. Children’s literature has always been an important part of Kate’s work, both in the classroom and in the hospital.

    Andrea McGinnis

    CCLS

    Andrea is a certified child life specialist with a B.A. in Psychology from The College of New Jersey and 10 years of experience at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She has worked in a variety of settings including the Emergency Department and inpatient surgical-trauma unit. Currently, Andrea is providing services to patients in the expanding outpatient settings of Urology, General Surgery, Endocrine, Dermatology, Plastic Surgery, and Phlebotomy.

    Andrea is involved in several quality improvement initiatives throughout the hospital and co-facilitates a sibling support program known as Sibshops She has a particular passion for surgical preparation, coping techniques for painful procedures, and therapeutic play. Andrea has been able to integrate literature into her daily practice in the outpatient setting and through her therapeutic play work with siblings.

  • Tech This Out! Utilizing Telepresence to Increase Socialization and Interactive Engagement among Pediatric Patients on Isolation Precautions

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​We will describe how a child life specialist and Patient Activity Coordinator collaborated to create telepresence opportunities for hospitalized patients on isolation precautions. Telepresence was facilitated through the hospital Telemedicine and video conferencing using iPad technology.

    We will describe how a child life specialist and Patient Activity Coordinator collaborated to create telepresence opportunities for hospitalized patients on isolation precautions. Telepresence was facilitated through the hospital Telemedicine and video conferencing using iPad technology. This team recognized that socialization is a key component of mental and overall health and sought out opportunities to connect patients.

    Objectives:
    Explore the barriers that patients on isolation face in the hospital environment and why telepresence was initiated.
    Discuss the various technology utilized to facilitate telepresence interactions.
    Identify future plans and growth for telepresence technology, and how plans include collaborating with multi-disciplinary teams.

    John Baker

    presenter

    Gretchen Renyer

    Presenter

    Jenna Simpson

    CCLS

    My name is Jenna Simpson and I am a Certified Child Life Specialist at Children's Mercy in Kansas City. I graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Early Childhood Education from Kansas State University in 2013 and completed my internship at Children's Mercy. I have been a CCLS for nearly 5 years and am currently working on an inpatient floor focusing on pulmonology, neurology, and diabetes. I have a passion for working with our patients with Cystic Fibrosis and truly love where I'm at.

  • A New Take on Diagnostic Education for a Chronic Population in an Outpatient Clinic

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    When a child is diagnosed with a chronic illness at birth, their development can be impacted. These children are often exposed to many medical experiences at a young age, before they are capable of understanding them.

    When a child is diagnosed with a chronic illness at birth, their development can be impacted. These children are often exposed to many medical experiences at a young age, before they are capable of understanding them. To ensure children with chronic illnesses receive diagnostic education during critical periods, a scaffolded education model can be used to target this population during outpatient visits.

    Objectives:
    Discuss chronic illness and the impact on development.
    Explore different theories regarding how children gain understanding of their illness at different ages and stages.
    Explore a scaffolded education model currently implemented in an outpatient sickle cell clinic setting.

    Katherine Bailey

    CCLS

    Katherine Bailey, MS, CCLS, earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Oklahoma, where she majored in Sociology and minored in Religious Studies. After researching the field of child life, she pursued further education at the Erikson Institute in Chicago, where she completed her Master of Science degree in Child Development. Katherine joined the child life team at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital after graduate school and provided services to patients in Infectious Diseases and Hematology. She currently provides services to patients in the outpatient Hematology clinic as well as serves on the leadership team within the child life program. Katherine has spent ten years providing education and support to patients with sickle cell disease and was a member of the committee that implemented a scaffolded education approach for school age patients with the disease.

    Rachel Lynn Schmelzer

    CCLS

    Rachel Schmelzer earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee in 2014. She continued her education at the University of Missouri, where she completed her Masters of Arts in Human Development and Family Studies in 2016. Rachel has worked as a child life specialist since August 2016, and joined the Child Life program at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in May 2017. She currently works with pre-teens and adolescents on the inpatient leukemia and hematology unit and has previous experience in an outpatient clinic setting.

  • Supporting the Bereaved Hospital Community: Steps in Creating an Annual Memorial Service

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This presentation will illustrate the importance of addressing bereavement needs of families, faculty and staff, through programming that includes a bilingual, non-denominational hospital memorial service. Attendees will gain knowledge to create a memorial service, and to expand on current programming

    This presentation will illustrate the importance of addressing bereavement needs of families, faculty and staff, through programming that includes a bilingual, non-denominational hospital memorial service. Attendees will gain knowledge to create a memorial service, and to expand on current programming. The presentation will be based on the evolution of the memorial service model created by the bereavement committee of a children's hospital. 

    Objectives:
    Assess the need for an annual hospital-wide memorial service as an effective source of bereavement support.
    Explain the multidisciplinary approach to planning and preparation of a hospital-wide memorial service.
    Identify components of a bilingual, non-denominational memorial service.
    Describe the impact that an annual memorial service has on families, faculty, and staff

    Shannon Meland

    CCLS

    Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital New York Presbyterian