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  • Implementing a Child Life Clinical Lead Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will describe the development and implementation of a Clinical Lead Program in response to employee engagement scores, lack of professional development opportunities, and Child Life Director needing more leadership support.

    This webinar will describe the development and implementation of a Clinical Lead Program in response to employee engagement scores, lack of professional development opportunities, and Child Life Director needing more leadership support.

    By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    - speak to the body of evidence proving the positive effects of child life leadership development on engagement, costs, and clinical outcomes. 

    - describe how the Clinical Lead positions were created, approved, and developed. 

    - articulate how the implementation of the Clinical Lead positions positively affected outcomes for the child life staff and the organization. 

    - glean insight from lessons learned, for the purposes of implementing such a program at other institutions.

    Domain: Professional Responsibility 

    Jamie Gentille

    CCLS

    Jamie Gentille  has been a CCLS since 2002 and has served as Child Life Director since 2006. She holds a Masters in Public Health from Walden University. She has extensive speaking experience and has implemented Clinical Ladder and Clinical Lead programs.

  • Implementing a Hospital-Wide Roll Out: A Proactive Approach to Supporting Patients with Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Challenges

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Children with developmental disabilities experience anxiety in medical settings. Appropriate training and a comprehensive program for support is needed to decrease anxiety-based responses and increase opportunities for preventative care for those patients. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Children with developmental disabilities experience anxiety in medical settings. Appropriate training and a comprehensive program for support is needed to decrease anxiety-based responses and increase opportunities for preventative care for those patients . This presentation will outline how one children's hospital implemented a hospital-wide program using quality improvement methodology.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Objectives:
    Identify the unique needs of patients with developmental disabilities and behavioral challenges in the health care setting.
    List specific strategies that have been shown to be effective when working with this population.
    Describe how to implement a program to address the complex needs of these children using electronic medical records and other resources available.
    Increase awareness of the challenges and barriers to implementing a hospital-wide program of this nature.

    Lina Patel

    Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Lina Patel, PsyD is an Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, practicing at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Dr. Patel is the Director of Psychology for the Anna and John J. Sie Center for Down Syndrome, a multidisciplinary consultative clinic coordinating care for infants, children, teens and young adults with Down syndrome. She provides consultation with schools, parent training regarding the management of challenging or unsafe behaviors, evaluation for dual diagnoses (Down syndrome and Autism), toilet training, and desensitization to medical devices (such as hearing aids and CPAP) and procedure-related distress. Outside of her clinical work, she has presented to numerous organizations across the country and internationally. She also conducts research on clinical issues impacting those with Down syndrome.

    Dr. Patel received her bachelor degree in Psychology from the University of Oklahoma. She received her masters and doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology. She completed her internship training at Boston University Medical Center and her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University’s Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.

    Jennifer H Staab

    CCLS

    Jennifer Staab is a certified child life specialist. Jennifer has worked as a child life specialist for 10 years in a variety of areas. Currently, Jennifer works at Children’s Hospital Colorado as a Supervisor and Research and Quality Improvement Specialist for the Child Life Department. She served as the chair of the Evidenced-Based Practice Committee for the Association for Child Life Professionals (ACLP) (2011-2013), the Research and Scholarship Committee for the ACLP (2015-2016), and the Proposal Subcommittee for the ACLP’s Scientific Advancement of Professional Practice (2016-2018). Jennifer has given numerous professional presentations. She has presented at ACLP’s Annual Conference for Professional Issues (2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, & 2017) and the Children’s Hospital Associations Annual Conference (2013 & 2018). Her research interests include identifying the factors associated with children experiencing elevated distress in a healthcare setting and evaluating the efficacy of child life services. She has published two studies. One on assessing pediatric patients for psychosocial risk and one on the efficacy of child life preparation and support in the Emergency Department

  • The Building Blocks of Resilience: Educational, Individual, and Workplace Strategies for Constructing Professional Well-Being

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Participants will be able to recognize the potential effects of child life work on personal and professional life. In addition, participants will be able to explore strategies to strengthen and support their own resiliency and discuss efforts to create positive change both individually and within their organization. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Professional Responsibility

    Participants will be able to recognize the potential effects of child life work on personal and professional life. In addition, participants will be able to explore strategies to strengthen and support their own resiliency and discuss efforts to create positive change both individually and within their organization. Lastly, the audience will be able to understand strategies to cultivate compassion satisfaction and nurture vicarious resilience.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Professional Responsibility

    Objectives:
    Explore the potential effects of child life work on personal and professional life.
    Explore strategies to strengthen and support their own resiliency and discuss efforts to create positive change within an organization.
    Understand strategies to nurture vicarious resilience.

    Cara Calderon

    CCLS

    Cheryl P. Lawrence

    CCLS

  • They Don't Believe my Pain is Real: Improving Care for Patients with Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) are a group of mental health disorders occurring in all patient populations. Typically considered outside of the child life scope of practice, child life specialists can play an instrumental role in streamlining support and diagnosis. Participants will learn how to recognize SSRD through the child life assessment, adapt care plans, and create resources to improve patient care and benefit hospitals fiscally. Learning Objectives: Discuss factors that indicate that a patient may have somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) when completing a child life assessment. Explore a modified child life care plan which supports patients with suspected or diagnosed SSRD. Examine how the child life role on the interdisciplinary team improves optimal patient care for SSRD and benefits the hospital system-wide. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Professional Responsibility

    Somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) are a group of mental health disorders occurring in all patient populations. Typically considered outside of the child life scope of practice, child life specialists can play an instrumental role in streamlining support and diagnosis. Participants will learn how to recognize SSRD through the child life assessment, adapt care plans, and create resources to improve patient care and benefit hospitals fiscally.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Professional Responsibility


    Learning Objectives: 

    Discuss factors that indicate that a patient may have somatic symptom and related disorders (SSRD) when completing a child life assessment.
    Explore a modified child life care plan which supports patients with suspected or diagnosed SSRD.
    Examine how the child life role on the interdisciplinary team improves optimal patient care for SSRD and benefits the hospital system-wide. 

    Natalie Wilson

    CCLS

    Natalie Wilson is a certified child life specialist who holds a Master of Arts degree in childhood studies with completed research on improving psychosocial support for children with chronic illness. She has worked at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada for the past four years and is a member of the Somatization Strategy Task Force to streamline support for families. Natalie previously worked at the Young Carers Program of Hospice Toronto for five years where she created a community child life program, including group programming that has been replicated across the province. Natalie is passionate about empowering children from a child and family-centred care model.

  • Catheters, Flushes, Ostomies, Oh My!: Providing Psychosocial Interventions for the Colorectal and Urology Population

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​This presentation shares how a child life specialist supports patients and families of the colorectal population, in an inpatient and outpatient setting. Common diagnoses, bowel/urological regimens, and specific therapeutic interventions to promote the coping and understanding of clinical and surgical treatments will be reviewed. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    This presentation shares how a child life specialist supports patients and families of the colorectal population, in an inpatient and outpatient setting. Common diagnoses, bowel/urological regimens, and specific therapeutic interventions to promote the coping and understanding of clinical and surgical treatments will be reviewed. These interventions are founded in medical play and adaptable across diverse and international patient populations.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Objectives:
    Describe the psychosocial needs of patients with invasive surgical procedures.
    Identify common colorectal diagnoses and options to promote bowel and urinary management.
    Learn and utilize various therapeutic interventions to promote coping, education, and normalization for this population and ways to adapt with other populations.

    Katrina R. Hall

    CCLS

    Katrina Hall, MA, CCLS, is a Child Life Specialist at Nationwide Children's Hospital and supports the patients and families of the Center for Colorectal and Pelvic Reconstruction. Katrina covers both inpatient and outpatient areas to promote continuity of care. Katrina received her master’s degree in Child Life from The University of Akron. Katrina joined Nationwide Children's Hospital over two years ago and has covered multiple areas before finding a passion for the colorectal population.

  • Child Life Services From Afar: An Educational and Resource-based Program to Support Adult Units in Supporting Children of Adult Patients at End of Life

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Children of adult patients at end of life is a growing area for child life services. This presentation explains the process and benefits of a program implemented to support children of adult patients at end of life without a child life position. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Assessment

    Children of adult patients at end of life is a growing area for child life services. This presentation explains the process and benefits of a program implemented to support children of adult patients at end of life without a child life position. Collaboration, education, and resources are highlighted as key components of the program, including statistics of program success.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Assessment

    Objectives:
    Assess the need for prioritizing child life support for children of adult patients at end of life within a clinical setting.
    Explore techniques on appropriate education for adult unit staff regarding best practices when offering support and resources to families for children experiencing end of life.
    Discuss various age appropriate resources and community organizations to assist in providing ongoing support of children experiencing death, dying, and grief.

    Katie J. Riese

    CCLS

    Katie Riese is a Certified Child Life Specialist at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, where she is a member of the pediatric palliative care program. Katie also supports adult services within UW Health to provide resources and clinical support for children of adult patients at end of life. Katie has presented on her collaborative legacy work for palliative care children and families with the hospital photographer at national and regional palliative care and child life conferences. Academically, Katie is currently obtaining her Master of Arts Degree in Education at Edgewood College, where she also is a graduate assistant with the Edgewood College Child Life Program.

  • Is Parenting and Child Development Universal?: How Research on Parenting Influences Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Cultural norms about parenting practices strongly dictate how parents raise their children and can influence the acceptance, delivery, and effectiveness of parenting program interventions. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Cultural norms about parenting practices strongly dictate how parents raise their children and can influence the acceptance, delivery, and effectiveness of parenting program interventions. This study sought to investigate parental knowledge, attitudes and practices among Arab parents in Qatar, identify knowledge practice gaps in order to develop a culturally sensitive parenting program, and determine the best delivery design for parenting programs.   SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Objectives:
    Define the culture studied including the challenges of research within the culture.
    Compare parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the studied culture and western cultures.
    Identify knowledge practice gaps that benefit from culturally sensitive parenting resources.

    Jenni L. Davis

    CCLS

    Sidra Medical

    Deirdrea A. Goltz

    Child Life Supervisor

    CCLS with experience in NICU, cardiology, and radiology. Passionate about research and evidenced based practice. Currently residing in Qatar and practicing child life abroad.

  • Growth Oriented Feedback: Methods for Making it Meaningful

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Feedback is an essential component of teaching and learning. The provision of meaningful, growth-oriented feedback has benefits for students, supervisors, academicians, as well as children, youth, and families. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Professional Responsibility

    Feedback is an essential component of teaching and learning. The provision of meaningful, growth-oriented feedback has benefits for students, supervisors, academicians, as well as children, youth, and families. Evidence will be applied to daily practice in this demonstration and discussion based session to enhance understanding of and increase participants confidence in the feedback process as it relates to clinical training.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Professional Responsibility

    Objectives:
    Discuss components and qualities of effective feedback and the evidence to support practice
    Discuss common barriers to providing effective feedback and the impact of ineffective feedback.
    Explore specific prompts, wording suggestions, and practices for delivery of effective feedback

    Katherine L. Bennett

    MEd, CCLS

    Katherine holds an undergraduate degree in psychology and child family studies from Freed-Hardeman University and a Master of Education in early childhood education from Vanderbilt University. Katherine has worked as a child life specialist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt since 2001 in various areas of the hospital. Currently, Katherine is the educator for the child life department at Vanderbilt. Katherine was an adjunct professor at Lipscomb University for 4 years. She is active in the Association of Child Life Professionals and has written for multiple publications as well as presented on various subjects related to child life.

  • Behavioral Approaches to Dental Care for Patients with Developmental and Behavioral Disabilities

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Children with autism and other developmental disabilities often have behaviors and sensitivities that make dental treatment one of the most difficult types of healthcare for them to receive. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Children with autism and other developmental disabilities often have behaviors and sensitivities that make dental treatment one of the most difficult types of healthcare for them to receive. Follow a pediatric dental team of a child life specialist and hygienist to learn strategies and adaptations to best provide support for patients with developmental and behavioral conditions in pediatric dentistry.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Intervention

    Objectives:
    Explore the need for child life services in pediatric dentistry, including current evidence-based need for individualizing healthcare for patients with developmental delays, as well as challenging and aggressive behaviors.
    Discuss how interdisciplinary collaboration, when combined with supportive interventions, leads to increased positive outcomes for patients, families, and the dental team.
    Explore child life techniques can be adapted for use with children with special needs and challenging behaviors in the healthcare setting to minimize distress and maximize coping during dental encounters.
    Discuss how to enhance their confidence and competence when providing services for patients with developmental delays and challenging behaviors.

    Kerri Birkett

    CCLS

    erri has been a child life specialist for nine years, working at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center for the past five years as a clinician working in the Adaptive Care Team for the outpatient department, facilitating and providing support during healthcare encounters for patients with developmental and behavioral challenges. Kerri is a handler to Cincinnati’s first hospital facility dog, incorporating the use of animal-assisted therapy in her daily practice. Kerri currently serves on the Professional Inquiry Council at Cincinnati Children’s and is a member of the Child Life Council’s Research Committee: Educational and Awareness Subcommittee. Kerri is currently leading a team to develop an evidence-based practice recommendation related to canine animal-assisted therapy in the healthcare setting. Kerri has been an integral member on a number of evidence-based practice projects at Cincinnati Children’s and mentors interns through their own evidence-based practice projects. Kerri is currently is completing an IRB approved research study on the effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy as an intervention to reduce pain and distress during outpatient botulinum toxin injections.

  • Easy as ABC: Creating a Policy for Non-Pharmacological Pain Management in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Research focuses on the value of providing non-pharmacological pain management for comfort during procedures in the NICU. This presentation describes the way one NICU team collaborated, researched, and implemented an adaptation of a system-wide policy based on the known needs of their specific neonatal and infant population. SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Assessment

    Research focuses on the value of providing non-pharmacological pain management for comfort during procedures in the NICU. This presentation describes the way one NICU team collaborated, researched, and implemented an adaptation of a system-wide policy based on the known needs of their specific neonatal and infant population. Positive results came from providing consistent, developmentally-appropriate support during painful procedures.  SUGGESTED DOMAIN: Assessment

    Objectives:
    Explore the developmental considerations and specific needs of infants and neonates within a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).
    Explore steps towards implementation of new guidelines for treating stress and pain in infants.
    Explore ways to educate and effectively communicate with the multidisciplinary team regarding newly created policies and guidelines.

    Morgan M. Livingstone

    Child Life Officer/Clinical Supervisor

    Morgan Livingstone has been passionately working in a Child Life community based child life practice since 2003.
    Morgan works locally in children's homes, hospitals, hospices and clinics providing traditional child life supports and preparations to children of all ages facing serious illness, surviving trauma, anxiety, illness of a family member, and loss/bereavement.
    Morgan also works in many low income countries around the world providing child life clinical supervision, education and hands on learning to build locally sustainable, locally staffed, culturally appropriate child life programs.

    Hailey E. Simpson

    CCLS

    Hailey Simpson graduated with a master’s degree in Human Development and Family Sciences from The University of Georgia in 2017. Following graduate school, Hailey completed her clinical child life internship at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Since then she has worked at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston in their Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. In addition to her clinical role, Hailey serves on many hospital and departmental committees including the NICU Neuroprotective Care Council. During her time in the NICU she has championed many unit initiatives including work on research-based developmental care practices, family visitation policies, sibling education & support, and non-pharmacological pain management practices. She is passionate about advocating for the littlest of patients and supporting their families during the hospitalization.