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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 11/15/2023 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    CCLS are often faced with ethical dilemmas in their daily practice. These dilemmas may arise from many different layers including the patients, families, health care team, and/or culture and society. Most who serve in health care subscribe to the Best Interest Standard, which is the "ethical requirement that people who care for others will do so in good faith, placing their assessment of that person's best interests above their own". As CCLS, navigation of Parental Authority, Pediatric Assent, Justice, and Respect for Person are common ethical principles that often arise with each intervention. However, veracity, or the obligation to be truthful may vary depending on culture. Often Eastern and Western Medicine and Culture have differing views on including children and adolescents in their health care decisions. As CCLS, who are often trained in Western Medicine, we must balance obligations to respect individual patient autonomy, professional truth telling, and tolerances of multicultural beliefs and values. This presentation will review ethical principles such as Beneficence, Nonmaleficence, Fidelity, and Cultural Relativism and how they relate to navigating ethical dilemmas, in particular with different cultural views or beliefs. For example, a CCLS may feel obligated to be honest if a patient asks, "What is happening to them?" or a CCLS may feel an obligation in Respect for a patient's autonomy to be included in decision making, memory making, or legacy building activities related to their medical diagnosis or prognosis. This presentation will provide participants an opportunity to utilize an Ethical Framework to navigate these ethical dilemmas and explore is Veracity, Always Best when working with different cultures. Suggested Domain: Ethics 1.0 PDU

    CCLS are often faced with ethical dilemmas in their daily practice.  These dilemmas may arise from many different layers including the patients, families, health care team, and/or culture and society.  Most who serve in health care subscribe to the Best Interest Standard, which is the "ethical requirement that people who care for others will do so in good faith, placing their assessment of that person's best interests above their own".  As CCLS, navigation of Parental Authority, Pediatric Assent, Justice, and Respect for Person are common ethical principles that often arise with each intervention.  However, veracity, or the obligation to be truthful may vary depending on culture.  Often Eastern and Western Medicine and Culture have differing views on including children and adolescents in their health care decisions. As CCLS, who are often trained in Western Medicine, we must balance obligations to respect individual patient autonomy, professional truth telling, and tolerances of multicultural beliefs and values.  This presentation will review ethical principles such as Beneficence, Nonmaleficence, Fidelity, and Cultural Relativism and how they relate to navigating ethical dilemmas, in particular with different cultural views or beliefs.  For example, a CCLS may feel obligated to be honest if a patient asks, "What is happening to them?" or a CCLS may feel an obligation in Respect for a patient's autonomy to be included in decision making, memory making, or legacy building activities related to their medical diagnosis or prognosis.  This presentation will provide participants an opportunity to utilize an Ethical Framework to navigate these ethical dilemmas and explore is Veracity, Always Best when working with different cultures.

    Suggested Domain: Ethics

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Utilize ethical tenets to assess and implement patient interventions 

    2. Review application of child life code of ethics, with emphasis on cultural implications 

    Leslie Daniels

    BA, CCLS

    Leslie Daniels, CCLS, is a Child Life Manager at Children’s Mercy Hospital (CMH) in Kansas City, Missouri. Leslie received her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Missouri-Columbia. For over twenty years, Leslie has worked in direct patient care, primarily serving in critical care areas and the emergency department, and she served as child life internship coordinator. Leslie has played an active role on the CMH Aftercare Committee, providing support to children and adolescents who have experienced the death of a sibling. Leslie holds a certificate in Pediatric Bioethics. Leslie has been active with ACLP, specifically the CLCC, most recently serving as Chair of the Certification Commission. Away from the hospital, Leslie enjoys spending time with her husband, Billy, and her children, Alex, Cheyanne, and John. She also enjoys visiting with family and friends and traveling.

    Lucy Raab

    MA, CCLS, Certificate in Pediatric Bioethics

    Lucy is the Assistant Director of the Child Life Department at Children’s Mercy Hospital Kansas City. Lucy has served on the ACLP Board of Directors as the Child Life Certifying Commission Chair and has been chair of the Ethics Committee for ACLP. Lucy has been a certified child life specialist at CM for 25 years, working clinically with a variety of patient populations and diagnoses. She is focused on facilitating psychosocial interventions that build and fortify resilience in patients and families facing healthcare challenges. Lucy is committed to prioritizing the coping, developmental, and emotional safety needs of patients and their families. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 11/06/2023 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Across the United States there has been a progressive and steady decrease in children admitted to the original hospital but rather transferred to another facility. The notification of a transfer can be a significant stressful time for pediatric patients and their families. The goal of an initial assessment by a child life specialist is to determine a child’s risk for negative psychological outcomes due to transfer and hospitalization and to plan appropriate interventions. This presentation will inform the child life community about a research study completed to show the benefits of pediatric patients receiving a toolkit intervention aimed at decreasing levels of stress and anxiety when transferring to a higher level care facility. The development of a new intervention will help alleviate such stress and can be beneficial for all parties involved. Certified Child Life Specialists collaborated with the interdisciplinary team to reduce the stress and anxiety of being in the Emergency Department by psychologically preparing and supporting patients for procedures, transfer, and admission to another hospital. Although child life specialists play an important role in children’s adaptation to hospitalization, evidence-based practice models support inter-professional collaboration as a means of strategically addressing complex issues associated with how children and their parents cope with medical challenges. Suggested Domain: Assessment/Intervention 1.0 PDU

    Across the United States there has been a progressive and steady decrease in children admitted to the original hospital but rather transferred to another facility. The notification of a transfer can be a significant stressful time for pediatric patients and their families. The goal of an initial assessment by a child life specialist is to determine a child’s risk for negative psychological outcomes due to transfer and hospitalization and to plan appropriate interventions. This presentation will inform the child life community about a research study completed to show the benefits of pediatric patients receiving a toolkit intervention aimed at decreasing levels of stress and anxiety when transferring to a higher level care facility.  The development of a new intervention will help alleviate such stress and can be beneficial for all parties involved.  Certified Child Life Specialists collaborated with the interdisciplinary team to reduce the stress and anxiety of being in the Emergency Department by psychologically preparing and supporting patients for procedures, transfer, and admission to another hospital.  Although child life specialists play an important role in children’s adaptation to hospitalization, evidence-based practice models support inter-professional collaboration as a means of strategically addressing complex issues associated with how children and their parents cope with medical challenges.

    Suggested Domain: Assessment/Intervention

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Initial assessment of a child to determine the efficacy of psychosocial interventions provided by a Child Life Specialist in preparing children for transport to another medical facility.

    2. Show the benefits of preparation for a pediatric patient being transferred to a higher level of care facility.

    3. Alleviate the stress and anxiety of a pediatric patient and their family through an interdisciplinary team approach when the unexpected is present during a pediatric medical emergency.  

    Isabel A. Barata

    MS, MD, MBA, FACP, FAAP, FACEP, FAAEM

    Isabel A. Barata, MS, MD, MBA, FACP, FAAP, FACEP, FAAEM is Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at the Zucker School of Medicine Hofstra/Northwell. She is the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Quality Director, for the Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics service lines. She has dedicated her career to improving the care of children in the emergency department through her extensive work in research, committee participation, and speaking engagements at the local, regional, national, and international level. Dr. Barata has been recognized with national and state awards for her commitment to the care of children in the emergency department.

    Stephanie Cuvier

    BA, CCLS, CEIM

    Stephanie Cuvier began her career over fifteen years ago as a Certified Child Life Specialist at Children’s Hospital of NY Presbyterian Hospital in New York (CHONY) in the pediatric emergency department and continued in that capacity at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, NY for six years.  Stephanie is currently the Lead Child Life Specialist at North Shore University hospital in the Northwell Health system in Manhasset, NY, where she specializes in pediatric emergency care and providing support for families of adult patients.  Stephanie is also a certified educator of infant massage, trained in Resolve Through Sharing, and is skilled in level two Reiki. She is also part of the NSUH Team Lavender that consists of interdisciplinary group of professionals who are dedicated to supporting their colleagues during times of stress and/or hardship.  She lives on Long Island, New York with her husband, her eleven-year-old son, and their rescue dog Zoey.

    Christine (Chrissy) Thorne

    MA, CCLS

    Chrissy received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, CT.  She received her Master of Arts degree in Early Childhood Education from Adelphi University in Garden City, NY.  

    Chrissy has been a Certified Child Life Specialist for ten years. She has worked in both the pediatric emergency department as well as the inpatient unit at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital in Stony Brook, New York. Currently, Chrissy is a Senior Child Life Specialist at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York. Here Chrissy currently works in the NICU, Labor and Delivery, outpatient radiology, and the pediatric emergency department in addition to assisting with adult referrals. In 2017, Chrissy was the recipient of the Hospital Hero Award. She actively assists families with various coping strategies in their time of need.  She is dedicated to working with siblings and families during the time of a family loss to help them cope. Chrissy lives on Long Island, NY. She enjoys running and spending time with her family and friends.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/17/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    The support that students gain as they enter the field of child life is wide and quite variable. Samantha and I will explore the topic of how this impacts the scope of psychological safety through the breakdown of the safety core components, survey response and literature support. Through the exploration we will then note some of the pieces we have fostered at our site to aid in the support and supplementation the creation of safety for our trainees. We will also look at where our department still has room to grow. While the focus of this work would be mainly on students, we will also look towards the new hire/first career support to foster an entry point that feels supportive and safe. Suggested Domain: Ethics 1.0 PDU

    The support that students gain as they enter the field of child life is wide and quite variable. Samantha and I will explore the topic of how this impacts the scope of psychological safety through the breakdown of the safety core components, survey response and literature support. Through the exploration we will then note some of the pieces we have fostered at our site to aid in the support and supplementation the creation of safety for our trainees.

    We will also look at where our department still has room to grow. While the focus of this work would be mainly on students, we will also look towards the new hire/first career support to foster an entry point that feels supportive and safe. 

    Suggested Domain: Ethics

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Define Psychological Safety

    2. Define Psychological Safety Impacts noted via literature support, survey and CHOP student feedback

    2. Understand how sites can aid in supporting students during the process of application, interview, and practicum/internship 

    4. Understand the job ready entry impact of moving into clinical supervision space, mentorship programs, and tailored onboarding, and early support when moving to a new location. 

    Courtney Dill

    MS, CCLS, LMT

    Courtney Dill, MS, CCLS, LMT is a child life specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She is currently working the capacity of training coordinator, where she guides practicum, intern and cooperative students in the Department of Child Life, Education and Creative Arts. Courtney's interest include promoting well being and alternative healthcare.

    Samantha Flick

    MS, CCLS

    Samantha Flick, MS, CCLS is a child life specialist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She is currently working in the pediatric Emergency room at our satellite campus in King of Prussia, PA. She has worked previously in our Pediatric ICU and Cardiac step-down and ICU. Samantha’s interests include sibling support, bereavement work and trauma-informed practice.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/06/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This presentation will explore how student programming was expanded to incorporate facility dog work in a new model for a practicum experience. An in-depth look at this institution's student programming model will be shared. The student’s unique perspective will be shared through a first-person student experience and direct connection to growth into internship readiness. This first-person experience will also be shared by facility dog handler and clinical trainer to reflect upon how the practicum student partnership offered an opportunity to explore clinical engagement. This presentation will also showcase future plans for program expansion and implementation in other institutions Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility 1.5 PDUs

    This presentation will explore how student programming was expanded to incorporate facility dog work in a new model for a practicum experience. An in-depth look at this institution's student programming model will be shared. The student’s unique perspective will be shared through a first-person student experience and direct connection to growth into internship readiness. This first-person experience will also be shared by facility dog handler and clinical trainer to reflect upon how the practicum student partnership offered an opportunity to explore clinical engagement. This presentation will also showcase future plans for program expansion and implementation in other institutions

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Define Facility Dog Program and Practicum Programing through the lens of ACLP and the Service Dog Organization.

    2. Learn about the benefits and structure of a Facility Dog Program and Child Life Student Program partnership.

    3. Discuss future and creative goals on how to implement programming into other hospital/teaching environments.

    Courtney Dill

    MS, CCLS, LMT

    Courtney Dill, MS, CCLS, LMT is a child life specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She is currently working the capacity of training coordinator, where she guides practicum, intern and cooperative students in the Department of Child Life, Education and Creative Arts. Courtney's interest include promoting well being and alternative healthcare.

    Elizabeth Olsen

    MS, CCLS

    Elizabeth Olsen has been a Certified Child Life Specialist for over fifteen years. Her previous experiences in healthcare include working in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NY Presbyterian and Good Shepherd Hospice in Long Island. She has been working at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) for the past five years and began her career there in the Special Delivery Unit. Elizabeth has been working with SSD Dilly, CHOP’s first Facility Dog, hospital wide for the past two and a half years. Elizabeth and Dilly help to support patient’s during procedures, co-treat sessions with various therapies, and with the Hospital School Program. Elizabeth has focused much of her career to supporting grieving children and families. She helped to develop the curriculum for the Hospice and Palliative Care of New York State Interdisciplinary Pediatric Palliative Care. In her new role, Elizabeth is currently working on a certification in Service and Therapy Dog Training Professional. She has presented at several national and local conferences on grief and loss, Animal Assisted Therapy interventions, and Perinatal Hospice.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 09/20/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This webinar will focus on providing racially conscious pediatric psychosocial care to the patients and families we serve. Areas that will be discussed include reflecting on the theoretical frameworks we use, understanding the importance of diversifying the field of child life, considering the influence of racism on health outcomes, and recommendations for our everyday practice in order to deliver high quality care for our diverse patients and families. Suggested Domain: DEI (domain of your choosing) 1.0 PDU

    This webinar will focus on providing racially conscious pediatric psychosocial care to the patients and families we serve. Areas that will be discussed include reflecting on the theoretical frameworks we use, understanding the importance of diversifying the field of child life, considering the influence of racism on health outcomes, and recommendations for our everyday practice in order to deliver high quality care for our diverse patients and families.

    Suggested Domain: DEI (domain of your choosing)

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To reflect on whether our practice is inclusive of patients and families from minority backgrounds

    2. Enforce the importance of practicing cultural humility

    3. Feel empowered to create a safe and inclusive environment for our diverse patients and families

    Maria Sohail

    CCLS, MSc, BASc

    Maria Sohail is a Certified Child Life Specialist working at McMaster Children's Hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, within the technology programming and inpatient support role. Maria holds a masters degree in Child Life and Pediatric Psychosocial Care and Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Behaviour and Autism Behavioural Sciences. As a visible person of colour, Maria is passionate about advocating for and ensuring that patients and families from marginalized and vulnerable populations receive the individualized care they need to feel and be successful

    Sherry Cheng

    CCLS, MSc, HBSc

    Sherry Cheng is a Certified Child Life Specialist currently working at the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Ontario within the Virtual Reality Program and float support role. Sherry completed her MSc in Child Life & Pediatric Psychosocial Care through McMaster University, where she gained valuable knowledge and experience that aligned with her interests in the therapeutic value of play, child development, and the process of developing resiliency. As an immigrant and person of colour herself, Sherry’s philosophy is to forever remain a learner, where she invites her patients and families to share with her unique knowledge about themselves. Sherry recognizes the different interactions and impacts that one’s culture can have on one’s identity and how that affects the care they wish to receive. Her goal is to seek out and include these pieces of information in her practice each and every time she creates an individualized care plan for her patients.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 09/07/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Our presentation will give an overview of the unique challenges and scenarios a CCLS may encounter as a one person program in a hospital or community setting. Given the current staffing shortages within the field, we recognize that not only are experienced professionals going into one person program positions, but these hard-to-fill positions are being taken by new graduates and emerging professionals; some of whom may have only had internship experience in large child life teams. While there are many similarities between hospital systems and how they function, there are also important differences that we feel professionals should be prepared to face when entering a one-person program. These things include, but are not limited to, prioritization challenges when covering multiple units, working with managers of other professional disciplines, advocating in an organization that is not familiar with atraumatic care principles. Because of some of these differences, a child life specialist in a one-person program may find themselves with far more administrative responsibilities than they may have initially realized. These responsibilities can include grant writing, donation procurement and organization, presentations and orientations for staff, volunteer training and direct supervision, intern selection, program development, liaising directly with communications/public relations teams, and so much more. Rather than being a "how-to guide" to starting a one-person program, we would like our audience to feel that they have a greater sense of the realities of working as a one-person program. We are hoping that our presentation will spark a robust discussion and audience engagement whereby we can share case examples, scenarios, resources and more. We hope that by sharing our experiences in one person programs, we can provide insight to the demands, share the unique challenges and offer tips for success to those in or interested in taking on the role of a one-person program. Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility 1.5 PDUs

    Our presentation will give an overview of the unique challenges and scenarios a CCLS may encounter as a one person program in a hospital or community setting. Given the current staffing shortages within the field, we recognize that not only are experienced professionals going into one person program positions, but these hard-to-fill positions are being taken by new graduates and emerging professionals; some of whom may have only had internship experience in large child life teams. While there are many similarities between hospital systems and how they function, there are also important differences that we feel professionals should be prepared to face when entering a one-person program. These things include, but are not limited to, prioritization challenges when covering multiple units, working with managers of other professional disciplines, advocating in an organization that is not familiar with atraumatic care principles. Because of some of these differences, a child life specialist in a one-person program may find themselves with far more administrative responsibilities than they may have initially realized. These responsibilities can include  grant writing, donation procurement and organization, presentations and orientations for staff, volunteer training and direct supervision, intern selection, program development, liaising directly with communications/public relations teams, and so much more. Rather than being a "how-to guide" to starting a one-person program, we would like our audience to feel that they have a greater sense of the realities of working as a one-person program. We are hoping that our presentation will spark a robust discussion and audience engagement whereby we can share case examples, scenarios, resources and more. We hope that by sharing our experiences in one person programs, we can provide insight to the demands, share the unique challenges and offer tips for success to those in or interested in taking on the role of a one-person program. 

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To understand expectations and role requirements of a 1 person program CCLS. 

    2. Understanding prioritization challenges as a 1 person program CCLS. 

    3. Advocacy as a CCLS when there is no CCLS representation at a leadership level.

    Alexandria Friesen

    BA, CCLS

    Alexandria has been a Certified Child Life Specialist since 2016 and began her career as a one person program in the largest community hospital in Ontario in 2017. In this role she provided child life services for a 29-bed paediatric inpatient unit, the largest outpatient community oncology clinic in the province, the surgical program, the paediatric palliative care program, and the Botox clinic. As Alexx continued her work in this organization, word of child life programming spread and by 2022 she was receiving referrals from labour and delivery, NICU, paediatric rheumatology clinic, KidFit clinic, outpatient labratory medicine, adult medicine, adult oncology, adult palliative care, and the adult ICU. It was her work in the adult ICU where a light shined on the huge gap in services to children of critically ill adult patients. Alexx and a colleague took it upon themselves to formally publish a children’s book to provide preparation to children visiting an ICU setting with FAQ and suggestions for the adults that will support them. In 2018 Alexx completed infant massage certification and in 2021 received education as a Certified Trauma Professional. She is working on completing her certification in grief counselling. In February 2022 Alexx made the decision to leave the hospital environment and has since been working as part of a two-person child life team in a community hospice. Currently, Alexx sits on the ACLP’s Community-Based Practice Committee and is on a working group with Ontario Health to develop a standard of care for Paediatric Palliative Care within the province. 

    Kirsten Black

    MS, CCLS, CPMT

    Kirsten has been a Certified Child Life Specialist since 2011. Prior to her becoming a child life specialist, she worked with the cystic fibrosis community for ten years with CF camps and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Kirsten began her child life career working in hospice supporting children of adults, and moved into a pediatric hospice and palliative care program in Tampa, Florida. She also worked with children's bereavement camps, children's support groups and a grief center. After the elimination of child life from the pediatric palliative care program, Kirsten moved across the state to start a one person program for a hospice serving Brevard County, FL. In 2019, Kirsten challenged herself to try a new setting and is currently working in community hospital in Melbourne, FL where she provides child life services in the pediatric emergency department and pediatric inpatient units, as well as child family members of adult patients throughout the hospital, from trauma to the ICUs. While technically the program is a 2-person program, Kirsten started the program as the sole specialist as she developed the program. Kirsten and her colleague still function as a one person program for six days of the week, when only one specialist is working at a time.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/23/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    A child life focused elective was created to increase inter-professional collaboration and enhance knowledge of child development for medical students. This elective encourages a more global awareness of how to treat the whole child, while also optimizing the utilization of resources within the healthcare setting. This webinar will provide insight into how one institution identified a need, and the steps taken to implement a successful 2-week immersive elective for 4th year medical students. Participants will learn about curriculum development, implementation, evaluation, and continued sustainment. Throughout this discussion, insight into the value this elective brings to all involved will be shared. Join us and leave feeling empowered to partner with your colleagues to create your own program. Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility 1.0 PDU

    A child life focused elective was created to increase inter-professional collaboration and enhance knowledge of child development for medical students.  This elective encourages a more global awareness of how to treat the whole child, while also optimizing the utilization of resources within the healthcare setting.  This webinar will provide insight into how one institution identified a need, and the steps taken to implement a successful 2-week immersive elective for 4th year medical students.  Participants will learn about curriculum development, implementation, evaluation, and continued sustainment. Throughout this discussion, insight into the value this elective brings to all involved will be shared.  Join us and leave feeling empowered to partner with your colleagues to create your own program.

    Suggested Domain: Professional Responsibility

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Discuss the design and completion of a needs assessment aimed at guiding development of a Child Life Elective.

    2. Identify key collaborators for successful development of a Child Life Elective.

    3. Describe steps used for curriculum development.

    4. Explain methods to evaluate success and maintain active enrollment in an elective of this nature. 

    Lisa Wolff

    MS, CCLS

    Lisa Wolff has been a child life specialist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital for five years. She received her master's degree in Child Life and Family-Centered Care from Wheelock College in Boston, MA. Lisa partnered with Amy Carter and Chris Mattson in 2019 to create a child life-focused elective for medical students and recently collaborated on a community engagement elective for residents. Lisa's primary clinical focus is the support of hematology and oncology patients and their families. She also has a passion for educating healthcare team members on the role of child life to increase interdisciplinary collaboration and improve the care of patients and families.

    Amy Carter

    MS, CCLS

    Amy Carter is a lead child life specialist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital.  She joined the team 24 years ago after receiving her master’s degree in Child life and Family Centered Care from Wheelock College in Boston MA.  Over the course of her career, Amy has worked as a child life specialist providing psychosocial support to enhance patient and family coping in both inpatient and outpatient settings.  She currently holds a lead position where, in addition to supporting clinical needs on the team, she coordinates student programming, assistants, and donations.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/14/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at increased risk of neurodevelopment impairments. Potential risk factors include being left alone for long periods of time with minimal stimulation, interaction, or opportunity to engage in developmentally appropriate play. An interdisciplinary team was formed and posited that volunteers may be an underutilized resource to help providers and families deliver neurodevelopmental care to pediatric cardiology patients. That team developed a volunteer program specific to this high-risk chronic population, with the goal of volunteers providing targeted developmental care during patient interactions. This webinar will outline the process of creating this program, the impact of interdisciplinary teamwork and discuss the benefits of training hospital volunteers to complete specific developmental support within their volunteer scope for any chronic patient population. ​ Suggested Domain: Assessment 1.0 PDU

    Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at increased risk of neurodevelopment impairments.  Potential risk factors include being left alone for long periods of time with minimal stimulation, interaction, or opportunity to engage in developmentally appropriate play.  An interdisciplinary team was formed and posited that volunteers may be an underutilized resource to help providers and families deliver neurodevelopmental care to pediatric cardiology patients.  That team developed a volunteer program specific to this high-risk chronic population, with the goal of volunteers providing targeted developmental care during patient interactions.  This webinar will outline the process of creating this program, the impact of interdisciplinary teamwork and discuss the benefits of training hospital volunteers to complete specific developmental support within their volunteer scope for any chronic patient population.

    Suggested Domain: Assessment

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will identify the need for a dedicated volunteer program within a chronic inpatient setting, and why it differs from a generalized volunteer program

    2. Participants will review data collected demonstrating the heightened impact of this program on patients, families, team members and volunteers

    3. Participants will gather resources and tips on developing a dedicated volunteer program for any chronic or at-risk inpatient population

    4. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions to an interdisciplinary group of presenters, gaining further insight or ideas for developing a dedicated volunteer program

    Sarah Scott

    MS, CCLS

    Sarah Scott has been a certified child life specialist at Children's Hospital Colorado for 8 years.  She worked in the cardiac intensive care and step-down units for 7 of those years, where she discovered a passion for advocating for patients with chronic illnesses.  While in cardiology, Sarah helped create the CINCO volunteer program to better serve this patient population.  Sarah now oversees the medical dog program at CHCO and continues to work with patients and families in cardiology on a consult basis with her facility dog, Galaxy.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/03/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    The location and extent of burn injuries often hinder the medical team’s ability to gain a comprehensive understanding of the child’s developmental and ability level. This can hinder how each multidisciplinary team member is approaching the patient’s care and offering appropriate interventions and activities. Under the leadership of the child life specialist, a burn center multidisciplinary team formally incorporated the Ages and Stages Developmental Screening tool into their standardized practice. The purpose was to gain an understanding of the patient's pre-injury developmental stage and abilities. Assessment results were incorporated into a treatment plan by the PT, OT and child life specialist. This presentation will discuss planning, implementation, results, and lessons learned. The presenters look forward to sharing the implementation of the screening tool for this specific population and discussing implications for other populations who are impacted by injury or necessary medical equipment Suggested Domain: Assessment 1.0 PDU

    The location and extent of burn injuries often hinder the medical team’s ability to gain a comprehensive understanding of the child’s developmental and ability level. This can hinder how each multidisciplinary team member is approaching the patient’s care and offering appropriate interventions and activities. Under the leadership of the child life specialist, a burn center multidisciplinary team formally incorporated the Ages and Stages Developmental Screening tool into their standardized practice. The purpose was to gain an understanding of the patient's pre-injury developmental stage and abilities. Assessment results were incorporated into a treatment plan by the PT, OT and child life specialist. This presentation will discuss planning, implementation, results, and lessons learned. The presenters look forward to sharing the implementation of the screening tool for this specific population and discussing implications for other populations who are impacted by injury or necessary medical equipment

    Suggested Domain: Assessment

    1.0 PDU

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe the Ages and Stages Developmental screening tool. 

    2. Identify opportunities for utilization at their facility and stakeholders within the multidisciplinary team. 

    3. Anticipate challenges with incorporating a screening tool. 

    4. Learn how to incorporate results into Epic charting.

    Alexis Castro

    MS, CCLS

    Alexis has been a certified child life specialist since 2014, with experience working in numerous Level 1 trauma centers. Alexis worked in a verified burn center for 6 years helping pediatric patients and their families cope through the burn care experience. In addition, Alexis managed the school re-entry program and youth and teen support groups. Alexis also shared her knowledge and experience working with groups such as the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation and the Phoenix Society’s World Burn UBelong program.  She holds a master’s in child life from Bank Street College of Education and a Certified Trauma Practitioner certification from Starr Commonwealth.

    Rosielyn Rufo

    MS, CCLS

    Rosielyn has been a certified child life specialist since 2020 with experience working in hospital and early intervention settings. She currently serves children and families in a community hospital with a robust pediatric service line, including Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Radiology, Burn Unit and Short Stay Surgery. Rosielyn has a master's in child life from Azusa Pacific University and a bachelor's in child development from California State University of Fresno.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 07/21/2023 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Developing autonomy and social identity within peer groups is a hallmark trait of adolescence. Inpatient hospitalization, evolving technology, and the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted how chronically ill adolescents interact with their peers. This presentation will discuss how group programming in the hospital setting can assist in mitigating these barriers to optimal development and provide participants with concrete tools to successfully establishing group programming in their institution. Suggested Domain: Intervention 1.5 PDUs

    Developing autonomy and social identity within peer groups is a hallmark trait of adolescence. Inpatient hospitalization, evolving technology, and the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted how chronically ill adolescents interact with their peers. This presentation will discuss how group programming in the hospital setting can assist in mitigating these barriers to optimal development and provide participants with concrete tools to successfully establishing group programming in their institution.

    Suggested Domain: Intervention

    1.5 PDUs

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will have exposure to background in theory and current research regarding adolescent development, and how hospitalization, chronic illness, and current cultural trends are creating barriers to optimal development. 

    2. Participants will have an understanding of different peer group modalities to establish safe and therapeutic, peer group environment with directed goals and objectives that meet the needs of varying ages, cultural backgrounds, interests, and developmental levels.

    3. Participants will understand strategies to successful group programming including physical settings, adaptability of facilitator, strategies for management of multiple patients, reflection and processing of activity, and continued follow up.

    Katie Sullivan Bradford

    MS, CCLS

    Katie is a child life specialist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital where she has worked with adolescents in acute care, the mental health population as well as chronic pain rehabilitation for over six years. She has been a certified child life specialist since 2011, and received her Masters in Child Development and Family Relations in 2010.